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Homestead to host screening of Campbell documentary

The final ride of the “Rhinestone Cowboy,” Glen Campbell, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2011, will be told in a special presentation of the documentary “Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me” Feb. 13 in the pavilion at Boulder Creek Golf Club, 1501 Veterans Memorial Drive.

The award-winning film chronicles the 151-city cross-country goodbye tour of the musician and his struggles with the disease. It is being presented by The Homestead at Boulder City, through its parent company, Volunteers of America.

“It is a great honor for us to bring the film to Boulder City,” said Mike Fox, residence director of The Homestead, which has a memory care unit.

According to Fox, Volunteers of America was chosen to distribute the film after Campbell, his family and the filmmakers became affiliated. Every city that has a Volunteers of America facility is hosting a special screening as a way to bring greater awareness to the disease.

Campbell, winner of a Grammy for lifetime achievement and member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, is known for hits including “Rhinestone Cowboy,” Wichita Lineman,” “Galveston” and “Gentle on My Mind.” He also helped blur the line between country and pop music.

The film follows Campbell and his family as their three-week tour grows into a year and a half tour, chronicling their love and resilience as well as the power of song.

It also features those who know and have worked with Campbell including Bill Clinton, Sheryl Crow, Jay Leno, Sir Paul McCartney, Brad Paisley, Bruce Springsteen, Taylor Swift and Keith Urban.

James Keach directed and produced the film and Trevor Albert served as producer.

Keach has appeared in more than 50 feature films and has produced and directed theater in Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. Among his film directing credits are “Waiting for Forever” and “Walk the Line.”

Albert has served as producer and executive producer of numerous films including “Waiting for Forever,” “Because of Winn-Dixie,” “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” and “Groundhog Day.”

“When Glen and the Campbell family asked us to make this film, he knew what he would face with the disease and what we would face in trying to shine a light of hope, love, laughter and faith through Glen’s and his family’s journey with Alzheimer’s,” they wrote on the film’s website.

The evening will begin with live music by Nancy Massena at 6 p.m. The film will be screened at 6:30, followed by a question and answer period and live music by Vern Lawren.

The reception will include refreshments.

Although there is no cost to attend, reservations are requested to ensure there is enough food, Fox said.

For more information or to make reservations, contact Curt Jeffrey at cjefferey@voa.org or 702-294-8720.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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