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Season reaps what we sow

As winter gives way to spring’s sunny and warmer days, the fruit trees in my backyard have begun to bloom.

The once-bare branches now sport delicate pink and white blossoms and tender green leaves.

It’s also time to get my garden ready. The beds are ready for young herbs and vegetables to be planted. Soon there will be tasty tomatoes from my backyard in my kitchen waiting for me to find a new recipe to try.

Just as the season brings new growth to our yards, it also brings a fresh new crop of political campaigns.

Like an early spring when plants begin to grow, a few candidate signs began popping up throughout the Las Vegas Valley early this year, particularly for judicial races, since the filing period for those seeking office was in the beginning of January.

My inbox also has been receiving press releases from candidates touting their qualifications along with their activities and great photo opportunities.

Now, since the filing period for local, county and state seats began March 2, campaign signs, press releases and other political material will begin appearing in earnest.

Already the race for the two-year term in the 3rd Congressional District is heating up. Rep. Susie Lee, who is seeking re-election, is being challenged by eight contenders.

After the filing period for the coming election ends Friday, I have no doubt that more signs and political ads will fill our streets, mailboxes and televisions.

They will keep growing and multiplying in quantity until there are so many that making a decision becomes nearly impossible. Campaign advertisements for local and state races will boost the already, seemingly endless supply of those for presidential candidates.

Like weeds in your garden, you need to sort through them to make sure the healthy plants survive. When you single them out, each candidate has redeeming qualities and qualifications.

The same thing holds true for bumper crops of tomatoes and zucchini. A few here and there are welcome and enjoyed. However, when we are inundated, there is no easy solution except leaving some on your neighbor’s porch.

That won’t stop me from tending to my garden, or researching each candidate’s qualifications. It’s a seasonal ritual. It’s an obligation. It’s what makes this country a place where I want to live. It’s what I do.

While not everyone has a green thumb or even the desire to grow things, we all reap the benefits of someone’s efforts, whether they be in the garden or in Congress, the state Assembly, the courtroom or the school board.

Just as I expect a bountiful harvest from my garden, I hope that the results of the June and November elections provide fruitful results that bring prosperity and harmony to our city, state and nation.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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