54°F
weather icon Partly Cloudy

Park a gem for residents to treasure

Opinions abound about what should be done with the old water filtration plant.

Odds are that if you get three people in a discussion about the issue, you will get at least five different ideas and options.

The building itself is historic but has long since outlived its original purpose. Certainly it can be left alone and admired like the sculptures that flank its eastern side in the Teddy Fenton Memorial Park Reflections Center.

It can be restored and used to teach visitors about the city’s early days and history.

Or it can be repurposed and used as something that will benefit community members, such as the buildings at ABC Park that now house an art center, youth center and fitness center.

There’s no rush to make a decision or even a compelling reason to have to make one. For now, it’s not in danger of falling apart or being demolished.

Council members voted last week to rezone the parcel under the water filtration plant as government park, which conforms to the city’s master plan and is how the land is being used.

Residents passionately spoke their minds about the zoning change when it was proposed, often hurling epithets at those who disagreed with them.

Whether you agree with the decision or not, now that it has been made it must be accepted.

So it’s time to take advantage of the park and not let it sit idle.

Sure, it’s been the site of a couple of special events in recent years, and the few people who have plots in the community gardens visit regularly. But what about the rest of us?

There are benches where you can sit and reflect on the day’s events and sidewalks so you can stroll through the sculpture garden. There’s even a picnic bench if you want to stop by for lunch or a snack.

The city is putting the final touches on a $95,000 project that is improving the irrigation system, adding lights, replacing dead plants with new landscaping and securing the benches better.

When it’s done, the park will be another gem in the city’s treasure chest.

It may be tucked away in a quiet neighborhood, but it’s time for it to be in the spotlight. Perhaps if more people appreciate what is or could be at the park, there will be fewer disagreements when it comes to looking toward its future.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
December wonderful time to be in BC

As Andy Williams once sang, “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year.”

Americans have ‘un-conventional’ source of hope

Before launching into the topic of today’s column, I hope you and your family enjoyed a bountiful Thanksgiving celebration featuring togetherness, good food and, perhaps above all else, good health. I am particularly thankful for my wife and family, the many blessings received over the last year and to be counted as a citizen of the United States of America.

Give thanks for all we have

Because the Boulder City Review publishes on Thursdays, I get the honor of wishing all of our readers a “Happy Thanksgiving” each year — and this year is no exception.

Much can be done in an hour

Have you ever figured out just what an hour a day represents? How often have you wanted to do something but said, “I didn’t have the time”?

Consider alternative ideas for lawn’s replacement

History is the story we want to pass on to future generations, hopefully somewhere they can find it. How we tell the story for future generations is the responsibility of the present generation.

City true winner from elections

After months of campaigning, the 2022 election is complete. Ballots have been counted and congratulations are in order for those who were elected.

Low-cost grocery store needed

One of the hot topics I’m hearing discussed in town is whether or not Boulder City needs a second grocery store. There is a question on the ballot this month (by the time this piece is published, the votes will have already been cast) regarding whether or not to allocate land at the corner of Veterans Memorial Drive and Boulder City Parkway for a shopping center that would include space for a new grocery store.

Pelletier’s dedication was blessing for city

After five years of service to Boulder City, Finance Director Diane Pelletier is retiring. I was mayor in 2018 when Interim City Manager Scott Hanson hired Diane. She came to us after 18 years of distinguished service for the Atlanta Regional Commission and 12 more for the Orange Water and Sewer Authority in North Carolina. We thought she was a major steal at the time. And she’s proved us right in every respect.

Media is the mess-age

My entire, mostly monolithic career was spent as a commercial broadcast professional. Knowing at an early age broadcast would be my chosen field, I took requisite communications studies preparatory to entering the business.