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Letters to the Editor, Nov. 28

City’s responsibility includes paying for recreation services

I was appalled at the City Council meeting on Nov. 12 during the discussion of the tentative capital improvement plan. Mayor Kiernan McManus commented that the operational manager of the two municipal golf courses should pitch in, to cover capital expenses, some of the contracted money he negotiated with the city to manage the golf courses. How insulting to a loyal partner of the city.

At least Councilman James Howard Adams recognized that the golf courses are a “service” offered to residents similar to parks and recreation department programs, the police and fire departments and many others. It is customary that nominal fees are charged for some of these services, but it is understood in budgeting that the fees will not cover all the costs.

Is the mayor suggesting that police officers start being charged for police cars or parks and rec instructors pay for the maintenance of the buildings in which they work? I have heard the mayor say in regards to other parks programs “What is the return on our investment?” Really!

What municipality in the country makes money on their parks?

The golf courses are a great asset to our community. Not only do our residents enjoy them but they also attract many visitors and tournaments to Boulder City.

What is the mayor’s alternative to covering fiscally justified infrastructure improvements — let them deteriorate and go to seed?

This council has its priorities upside down. It suggests that utility rates should be subsidized when in fact the utility fund should be self-sustaining, and that city services, which are the responsibility of the city to provide, should somehow demonstrate a “return on investment.” Well, the “return” is the quality of life offered in Boulder City and the satisfaction and involvement of the many residents who enjoy the soccer fields, ball parks, parks and a senior citizen who can play an affordable round of golf.

Peggy Leavitt

Trees add to streets’ beauty

Boulder City appears very committed to “beautifying” our streets (note the construction on Boulder City Parkway). However, in a matter of hours this week, 35 mature trees were cut down on Adams Boulevard between Utah Street and River Mountain Avenue. As with many decisions, we wonder whose brilliant idea was this.

Back when the city first decided to allow a solar company access to city land, the solar company “sweetened” the deal by donating 15,000 trees. Over time, many of those trees died from lack of care and other reasons.

The trees cut down along Adams developed into beautiful specimens, shading the walkway for a mile. Many people have enjoyed mid-summer, midday exercise made possible by the shade of those trees. Countless birds and other wildlife sheltered there as well. I was told the trees had gotten too big and were growing into the power lines. I’m sure those are not the only excuses. Why not provide maintenance of existing beauty with money being used to create more? What a tragedy.

Lynn Fielding

Realtor’s expertise appreciated

We recently sold our house in just 18 days thanks to Lori Giunta at BC Adobe Realty. She was so great to work with. We were a bit anxious since the same model as ours across the street had been on the market for 157 days.

Lori is in contact with you every two or three days and she knows everything. In 18 days we had three offers. Way to go, Lori.

Our neighbor across the street told me 15 cars of Realtors pulled up one day with Lori at the head of all of them. Ha ha. She is something else. Thank you, Lori. God bless you.

If you are looking for a great Realtor, call Lori Giunta. Start packing after you sign the contact.

Ron and Laurie Van Diest

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