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Letters to the Editor, May 30

Community Club’s support appreciated

The Senior Center of Boulder City wants to give a huge thank you and recognition to the Boulder City Community Club. For those who are not aware, the Boulder City Community Club holds the yearly Doodlebug Bazaar. The bazaar sells all kinds of homemade crafts and creative items to raise money, then reinvests those funds to support local community groups and organizations.

The Senior Center of Boulder City has been a recipient of the club’s generosity numerous times over the years. It is the thoughtful giving of groups like the Community Club that make the Boulder City community the awesome place that it is.

The Senior Center of Boulder City had the honor of presenting the Boulder City Community Club officers with the third nameplate on our legacy board. The center’s legacy board is a way of recognizing donations made to the center and is located in the main recreation area of the center.

It never ceases to amaze and humble me the amount of love and support all the local residents and businesses alike demonstrate to the community. There is no other place like it.

Victoria Lee Mason,

Executive director

Senior Center of Boulder City

Police response humiliating

As a longtime resident of Boulder City and having started a couple of businesses, I’m familiar with the police receiving an occasional call from a concerned citizen in regard to after-hour activity, thus dropping by to make sure all is in order as it should be. I was always appreciative for both the caller and the officers for what I consider legitimate concerns for both the contact and respondent.

First of all why on earth would a neighbor allegedly call to report that (Michael) Nix was petting his lions? No call was listed in the police blotter that I read about. Besides that, is there a law against it? Was he within the boundaries of his own property? Was he creating a threat?

Secondly, I feel the police response to be intimidating and humiliating for Nix. It was grossly overacted as well as disrespectful.

It seems Nix’s use of humor left him open for public ridicule as well. I, for one, would not appreciate the lack of professional conduct on behalf of the officers. Their only concern should have been to ask Nix if he resided there and to assess his actions to see if further investigation was warranted, most certainly with a courteous approach.

It seems there is a lot of idle time in Boulder City both for our concerned citizens and our police department. To ridicule Nix in the paper and for the police department to actually follow up on such an obviously ridiculous complaint sounds like letting Prince Albert out of the can may be a serious concern also. It’s Nix who’s owed an apology, not the other way around.

Candy Terrell

Pool expense too much to bear

Rod Woodbury needs to realize that his great-uncle Clare, father Bruce and sister Melissa’s accomplishments in public service are not his accomplishments — so don’t run your campaign on your family’s past accomplishments. We need someone in touch with the present and future of Boulder City, not the past. The past is what has made us what we are today, but we need to address the present and the future.

Kudos to Fred Voltz on his May 16 letter to the editor concerning the multimillion-dollar pool project. I found it very informative and totally honest about all the long-term debt we are currently shouldering without adding any more debt. I, for one, cannot afford an increase in property taxes along with utility rate increases since my husband and I live on Social Security alone due to his 2½-year cancer treatment that wiped out our savings.

The $5 million being asked for in ballot Question 1 from the capital improvement fund for the design of a new aquatic center would make for a good start to refurbishing the old pool complex. Who spends $5 million on a design anyway? There are 16,000 residents and only 115 people using the pool on a daily basis, which is a very small percentage of people using the facility to incur $80 million in debt for a 30-year period.

Sharon Teagarden (Brohard)

Mayor’s experience irreplaceable

Over the past several years the Hemenway Valley Coalition Group has been working with city officials in an attempt to find a solution to the unsightly electrical transmission lines in Hemenway Valley. Mayor Rod Woodbury has been instrumental in assisting us with this endeavor. Specifically he has attended homeowners meetings, met with us in his law office and arranged meetings with officials at city hall. Throughout this process Woodbury has offered advice, provided guidance and helped us navigate the city bureaucracy. His most recent helping hand permitted us to have a meeting with NV Energy in an attempt to develop an alternative plan.

Woodbury’s reputation, respect and trust has enabled him to develop invaluable relationships with organizations throughout Nevada. Boulder City cannot afford to lose this experience. Woodbury has our support.

Hemenway Valley Coalition Group

Cokie Booth

George Cox

Michael Giroux

Tom Jones

Robert & Lori Merrell

Tom Perkins

Bill to aid museum passes first hurdle

We have very good news about AB84, the bill which will allocate $30 million for the state railroad museum in Boulder City. The bill has unanimously passed the Assembly Ways and Means Committee of the Legislature. So, we have high hopes for final passage on a bipartisan basis.

Sen. (Joe) Hardy and I have worked hard to gain support, and we want to thank those Boulder City leaders who have come to Carson City and lobbied very successfully for this important measure, especially Mayor Rod Woodbury, Councilwoman Peggy Leavitt, city staff members and Jill (Rowland-)Lagan, CEO of the Boulder City Chamber of Commerce. The project will be a wonderful step forward for our community’s ability to attract visitors and benefit local businesses.

Assemblyman Glen Leavitt

Citizens received responses

In his recent letter to the editor, Fred Dexter attempted to get away with a last-minute political smear by falsely claiming that Mayor Rod Woodbury is the chief architect and advocate for “an $80 million aquatic center.” Dexter also makes the laughable claim that “Woodbury’s administration” has allowed the continuation of poor maintenance and minimal upgrades on the existing pool.

Like the other members of the City Council, Woodbury has responded to the many requests to allow the citizens to vote on a proposed aquatic center. He has not campaigned either for or against these questions, leaving it to the citizens to make their own independent decision.

At the recent candidate forum, every one of the candidates for mayor and city council agreed that the pool is in serious need of either replacement or total renovation, and its deteriorated state certainly long predates Woodbury’s term in office. Apparently, Dexter wants us to believe that the mayor, who has only one vote, just like Councilman (Kiernan) McManus, is solely responsible for pool maintenance and authorizing ballot questions.

I must have missed it when the “McManus administration” came to the rescue and remedied all of what Dexter says is poor maintenance during the two years McManus has been on the City Council. Sadly, Dexter is just the latest scripted messenger in the never-ending attempts by the McManus campaign to invent phony claims and attacks against our mayor.

Jim Croft

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