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Letter to the Editor, Sept. 26

Old airport proposals lacked consideration of neighbors

I recently attended a meeting of the Historic Preservation Committee to hear three proposals for possible use of the Bullock Field hangar and airstrip and was disappointed by all three presentations. None of them had a tone of neighborliness toward those of us who currently reside in the area.

No mention was made of preserving views, keeping noise levels low, mitigating light pollution, policing litter or caring for security as traffic inevitably increases to the area. I’d like to see the City Council consider the following and require that all proposals take into account direct impacts on those of us who are neighbors to the airfield.

I’d like to see the city require no further obstruction of valley views. This would likely mean no more two-story homes or tall commercial structures in this area.

Existing homes along the runway are slightly elevated on the sloping grade to the valley, which means that centers of noise will exponentially impact current residents since noise travels up and out like a bubble. Would-be developers should be required to demonstrate plans for noise mitigation.

Low-light requirements should be mandatory and enforceable to preserve the beauty of our night sky for visitors and residents alike.

The proposals I’ve heard will produce increased traffic from people who may not care for the area like they do their own backyards. I’d like to see the city require security and clean-up guidelines in order to be considered seriously.

If a campground or a new neighborhood is permitted, it would be a shame to allow a bunch of concrete walls. Neighborhoods that are walled off and chopped up by concrete walls experience impeded air flow. Development in this area would seem much more friendly if broken up by open spaces and desert plants.

Teri Moss

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