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Councilman will be missed

Updated October 23, 2019 - 4:27 pm

It is a very sad day in Boulder City.

Wednesday morning, I learned of the passing of Councilman Warren Harhay. It’s a loss that will be felt deeply by the entire community.

When I first got to know Warren, he had just announced his intention to run for City Council. He stopped by the office to chat, share his vision for the city and explain why he felt he was the best man for the job.

While he did his utmost to come across as a jovial and bumbling grandfather who only wanted to do his part to make the city and world a better place for his grandchildren, it didn’t take me long to figure out that he was a very smart and shrewd man.

Every decision he made and every vote he cast was based on careful research and done with the city’s best interests in mind. His actions weren’t always popular but they were what he felt were necessary to ensure the city’s good health and fortune in the future. His intentions were purely honorable.

I never saw any indications that he had a hidden agenda or was anything other than the man he presented himself to be: thoughtful, caring and genuine.

When he ran for mayor earlier this year, he said he had been working diligently during his two years on the council to help restore people’s trust in local government. It was his goal to continue doing what he could so that citizens had faith in their leaders. He never wavered from that goal.

It was what drove him to improve communications between “us and them.” It was why he spent Saturday mornings in a local coffee shop listening to what people had to say.

“I believe we must do a better job of listening,” he said at the time.

Not only did give his all to official city affairs, Warren was frequently seen at community functions. He devoted hours to just being part of the community. He seemed to enjoy being out among the crowds, whether it was eating pancakes during the Damboree festivities or when he was dressed in a costume as Herbert with his dog Hoover at the inaugural Pooch Parade in November.

Even when he was confined to a hospital bed, he kept track of everything going on in the city and participated in council meetings by telephone.

During his illness, we spoke several times about issues and events that were of concern to him. And each time I sent along prayers for a speedy recovery and told him how much his voice of reason was needed.

It is my hope that his spirit will continue to guide our city leaders.

Rest in peace my friend. You will be missed.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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