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Congratulations to new city leaders

Congratulations to Kiernan McManus, who was elected mayor, and James Howard Adams and Claudia Bridges, who were elected to City Council in Tuesday’s election.

Their messages of conservative growth, sound fiscal management, government transparency and historic preservation is what the people of Boulder City seek for the community’s future.

Results of the election will be made official during a special City Council meeting at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 18, and they will be sworn into office June 25.

We wish them all success and look forward to working with them and seeing them turn their ideas and campaign promises into plans of action.

And this is where the fun begins. After six long and sometimes brutal months campaigning, the hard work of tending to the city’s business begins.

Among the major tasks facing the newly elected representatives will be mending the fences that were broken during the campaign and re-establishing trust in our city’s government.

During the past two elections, the people have spoken and ousted the incumbents. That speaks volumes about residents’ level of trust that their elected representatives are doing what they were elected to do — namely represent their interests.

We know it’s not an easy job to do. We also know there are many factors that play into each decision that residents are not always aware of. That’s where the promises of continued and more transparency in government will come in to play.

Each of the newly elected officials will bring their own special skills to the city’s governing board and we’re confident they will put those skills to use to benefit the city and residents.

Serving the community goes beyond the few hours spent in council meetings each month. There are agenda packets to read and study, other government agencies in the county that require representation from Boulder City, and obligations to attend community functions.

We recognize the sacrifices the new city leaders are going to make as well as the ones by those leaving office.

A hearty thanks goes to outgoing Mayor Rod Woodbury, who spent a combined eight years as mayor and council member, and outgoing council members, Peggy Leavitt and Rich Shuman for their eight and four years of service, respectively. Their work on behalf of the city and doing what they felt was best for its residents is appreciated.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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