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Services pay tribut to fallen soldiers

On Memorial Day weekend in Boulder City, residents, visitors and officials stopped to remember and honor those in the military who died protecting the United States.

Sunday, hundreds of motorcyclists participated in the Las Vegas Vietnam Vets-Legacy Vets Motorcycle Club’s 25th annual Fly Your Flags Over Hoover Dam run, traveling from the Arizona side of Hoover Dam to the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery.

Arrow, president of the club, said he was moved by the patriotism he saw among the riders and those who lined the route to wave and cheer them on.

“Grief from loss might change from year to year, but it never goes away,” he said during the ceremony, which honored and remembered those who lost their lives serving the nation. “These heroes answered the call and are worthy of our remembering.”

Also participating in the ceremony were members of the Special Forces Association, Chapter 51, of Las Vegas. Association members, accompanied by their wives and a few women from those who assembled for the ceremony, placed American flags and red roses in front of a memorial as they shared how many Green Berets had died each month.

On Monday, May 27, the Nevada Department of Veterans Services held its annual Memorial Day ceremony at the chapel in the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery.

Keynote speaker Henderson Municipal Court Judge Mark Stevens spoke about reflecting on the “extreme cost” of war and those who were lost.

“The priority should be the appreciation for those who fought and lost their lives. … The sacrifices they provided, they created the freedom we experience,” he said about celebrating Memorial Day.

Stevens also said it is right to “honor, respect and remember” them, their sacrifices and what they have done for the country.

Monday’s ceremony was sponsored by the Military Order of the Purple Heart and emceed by its historian Chuck N. Baker.

There was also a presentation from Operation Battle Born Ruck March. The group of veterans marched more than 400 miles from the Battle Born Memorial in Carson City to the Boulder City veterans cemetery. They carried replica dog tags of members of the armed forces who had died in combat since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. Participant and veteran Sean Brown presented the tags to Nevada Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske.

The program also featured musical performances, including two by Phil Esser of Boulder City. Residents of the Nevada State Veterans Home in Boulder City, Blue Star Mothers, Gold Star parents and the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery Association members and volunteers were recognized.

The Scottish American Military Society, Post 711, presented the colors, and the Boulder City Veterans Pilot Group did a flyover in the missing man formation.

Several state officials attended the program including U.S. Reps. Susie Lee and Steven Horsford.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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