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Recycling Christmas trees encouraged

Boulder City residents can recycle their Christmas trees for free from Sunday, Dec. 26, until Jan. 16.

Trees can be dropped off 24/7 in the recycling container at Bravo Field near the corner of Eagle Drive and Sixth Street.

The Boulder City recycling program is part of an effort to keep trees out of landfills in Southern Nevada and is done in partnership with BC Waste Free and the city of Henderson.

When dropping off a Christmas tree at the recycling container, all nonorganic objects such as lights, wire, tinsel, ornaments and nails should be removed. Artificial Christmas trees and those with artificial snow cannot be recycled.

After the trees are recycled, they are turned into organic mulch, which residents can get for free starting Jan. 4. The mulch is available on a first-come, first-served basis through Feb. 1 at Pecos Legacy Park, 150 N. Pecos Road, and Acacia Park, 50 Casa Del Fuego St., both in Henderson.

Those coming to get mulch should bring their own shovel and a container.

The holidays are also a good time to recycle the cardboard, plain gift bags and cards that accumulate during the season. BC Waste Free accepts a variety of these items for recycling from their customers. A complete list can be found at https://bcwastefree.com/faqs/.

For more information about tree recycling, call Boulder City Public Works at 702-293-9301 or BC Waste Free at 702-293-2276.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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