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Programs for mental health issues may reduce use of 911

Hand-in-hand with the 911 issue is the growing problem of mental health issues dissolving into law enforcement actions. Some towns and counties are partnering to revive a mental health program that aid frequent 911 callers and have saved taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars. These programs assist in identifying why callers are frequently using the 911 system when an alternative is to be connected with nonprofits or veterans’ groups that can help them.

The overall goal is to promote self-sufficiency with a proactive approach and to help emergency medical services become more than just a transportation service. These resource access programs provide outreach and resources to residents who are frequent 911 callers while reducing unnecessary emergency room visits. Teams of this type are made of personnel from fire and rescue departments, private ambulance services, county resources and treatment providers for members of the community who are exceedingly vulnerable and often in crisis.

There are grants that are available to assist in connecting residents who frequently use the emergency system for nonmedical emergencies. This includes mental health, homelessness and substance abuse. Sometimes these teams include members of available psychiatric emergency response teams. They are identifying those individuals who need specialized care and connect them with the help they need so they don’t have to call 911.

This can be a shining example of how the city and county can work together to find solutions to the region’s mental health crisis.

Oct. 24. Fraud: The “friend” asks a favor to cash a check and now the good deed has repercussions at 11:32 a.m. in the 800 block of Utah Street.

Disabled: The callers notice a disabled vehicle, with two legs sticking out from underneath, alongside the road at 2:58 p.m. in the area of Interstate 11 and U.S. Highway 95.

Thought for the day: The driver states the methamphetamine use has nothing to do with the desire to lay underneath the disabled vehicle. It’s to avoid the sun.

Oct. 25. Alarm: The responsible party advises they are in hot pursuit of a furry felon that keeps avoiding all trapping attempts at 1:26 a.m. in the 700 block of Canyon Road.

DUI: The subject is excited to perform field sobriety tests to confirm their state of nondrunkness at 6:10 a.m. in the 1600 block of Boulder City Parkway.

Thought for the day: Sometimes you have to wonder: Starting early or ending late?

Oct. 26. Vandalism: The property shows signs of squatting and vandalism at 12:49 p.m. in the 500 block of Sixth Street.

Suspicious: The man is banging two bricks together while walking down the street at 9:08 p.m. in the area of Adams and Buchanan boulevards.

Thought for the day: Thanks to those neighbors keeping an eye on nearby vacant residences.

Oct. 27. Trespassing: Dumpsters aren’t for diving or sleeping purposes from here forward at 5:10 a.m. in the 1000 block of Nevada Way.

Suspicious vehicle: The caller reports someone living out of a vehicle nearby for several days at 10:33 p.m. in the 500 block of California Avenue.

Thought for the day: I’ve stayed in some low rent places before but none that involved a garbage truck or dome light.

Oct. 28. Burglary: The homeowner arrives home to a very unpleasant surprise at 12:34 p.m. in the 1400 block of Bronco Road.

Burglary: Another unfortunate situation awaits another resident at 4:42 p.m. in the 800 block of Pebble Beach Drive.

Thought for the day: Keep your eyes open for your neighbors in all areas of town.

Oct. 29. Suspicious: Loitering and asking questions about past robberies are enough to get the subjects invited to leave the area at 8:13 p.m. in the 1600 block of Boulder City Parkway.

Threats: The customer doesn’t care for the answer given and has a specific remedy in mind at 8:20 p.m. in the 1000 block of Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: There’s no situation that can’t be made worse with just a little effort.

Oct. 30. Disturbance: Drinking and street fighting aren’t the best parts of the relationship but the outstanding warrants clinch the cool-down period at 1 a.m. in the 1200 block of Potosi Street.

Accident: The elderly resident doesn’t want to discuss any vehicle incident with the caregiver at 4:28 p.m. in the 800 block of Robinson Lane.

Thought for the day: The bumper and fender pieces in the yard and a trail of fluid leading to the back of the parked vehicle tell their own story.

Thought for the week: “Notice that autumn is more the season of the soul than of nature.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

Tina Ransom is a dispatcher with Boulder City Police Department. She is coordinator of the Boulder City Citizen’s Academy.

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