85°F
weather icon Clear

Plan to extend I-11 omits Lake Mead option

As transportation officials mull the future of the important Interstate 11 build-out, one option is now off the table.

I-11 initially would link the two largest metropolitan areas in the nation not already connected by a major interstate: Las Vegas and Phoenix. Further plans call for I-11 to run from Mexico to Canada, for a needed north-south interstate in the West.

Three initial I-11 corridor options have been under review.

The eastern option that would have run through the Lake Mead area near the Arizona border was removed from the list for numerous reasons.

This included potential impact to sensitive environmental resources and protected areas, according to Adrienne Packer, Nevada Department of Transportation spokeswoman. Additionally, access, mobility, connectivity, financial feasibility and public opposition played a role in the decision.

The remaining two corridor options, western and central, will advance for further study as part of the Nevada Department of Transportation Interstate 11 Planning and Environmental Linkages study.

The western corridor option would run from the initial 15 miles of I-11 constructed from the Arizona border to near the Henderson Spaghetti Bowl, to the 215 Beltway at that point, and then around to link to U.S. Highway 95 in the northwest.

The central corridor alternative could turn from I-11’s endpoint in Henderson and continue on the freeway, where it turns into U.S. Highway 95 and would continue on through to the Kyle Canyon area.

NDOT has an open public comment period through Sept. 30 encouraging input regarding the two remaining corridor options and the overall project.

The next in-person meetings taking place over the next couple of weeks are:

Tuesday: RTC Southern Nevada, conference room 108, 600 S. Grand Central Parkway, from 4-7 p.m.

Sept. 16: Windmill Library, 7060 W. Windmill Lane, from 2:30-5:30 p.m.

The selection of the preferred route is not expected to be announced until May.

“Although construction is years away, public input is vital to our planning,” Packer said.

Contact Mick Akers at makers@reviewjournal.com or 702-387-2920. Follow @mickakers on Twitter. Send questions and comments to roadwarrior@reviewjournal.com.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Lake gets slight boost, but drier times ahead

After falling more than 27 feet since the start of the year, Lake Mead got a bit of a bump thanks in part to the August monsoon season.

Chamber endorses plan to split up CCSD

Boulder City Chamber of Commerce is one of six Southern Nevada chambers of commerce that endorsed the Community Schools Initiative that would split up the Clark County School District if voters approve it in 2024.

Rehabilitation helps with illnesses, injuries

Rehabilitation is care that can help you get back, keep or improve abilities that you need for daily life. These abilities may be physical, mental and/or cognitive (thinking and learning). You may have lost them because of a disease or injury, or as a side effect from a medical treatment. Rehabilitation can improve your daily life and functioning.

City aboard land plan for new train museum

The Boulder City Council met Tuesday evening for a relatively light meeting in terms of agenda items. The fire department gave its annual presentation to the council, two bills were introduced and an ordinance that will provide 0.94 acres of land to the Nevada State Railroad Museum was unanimously approved.

Grant aims to help protect, conserve endangered species

While many people are fretting over the massive reduction of water at Lake Mead, the over 387 species of animals that call the lake home have also had to adjust to the drought.

Curreri joins city as public works director

Jamie Curreri has joined the city as its new public works director. He started Monday, Sept. 12, and replaces Keegan Littrell, who left in May for a position with Henderson.

Snake season: Warm temperatures bring out vipers

It’s summer and triple-digit weather season in the Boulder City and the Las Vegas Valley. While the heat can be a nuisance to some, rattlesnakes are thriving and catching some rays.