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News Briefs, Dec. 5

Updated December 11, 2019 - 9:55 am

City property vandalized

Bicentennial and Oasis parks were vandalized over the weekend. According to the city, vandals spray-painted the bathrooms and equipment.

“Boulder City residents take a great amount of pride in our parks,” said Roger Hall, Parks and Recreation director. “It is very disappointing whenever individuals deface our community property. It’s disrespectful to every person who lives in and loves this great community.”

The police department is investigating and the suspects could face criminal charges.

Anyone with information about the vandalism should call the police dispatch nonemergency line at 702-293-9224.

2020 Census hosting local job fair

The U.S. Census Bureau is holding a job fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today, Dec. 5, at The Homestead at Boulder City, 1401 Medical Park Drive.

There will be full- and part-time positions available, with salaries from $16.50 to $18 per hour.

All applicants must be at least 18 years old and able to accommodate a flexible work schedule including days, evenings and weekends. Men who apply must have registered with the selective service or have a qualifying exemption. A background check will be run on applicants.

For more information, call 1-855-562-2020 or go to https://www.census.gov.

Recent rain lessens amount of dam water to be released

The recent rain in Southern California and Arizona mean less water will need to be released from Davis and Parker dams on the lower Colorado River, according to the Bureau of Reclamation.

At Parker Dam, north of Parker, Arizona, hourly releases have been reduced to approximately 1,800 cubic feet per second for the next few days and possibly through the weekend. Hourly releases at Davis Dam, north of Laughlin, Nevada, were reduced to approximately 2,300 cubic feet per second Wednesday, Dec. 4, and could continue through Sunday, Dec. 8.

Due to the existing drought conditions in the Colorado River Basin, the Bureau of Reclamation is trying to save as much water as possible in the river’s storage system. The temporary reduction in releases at Davis Dam will help reduce the risk of excess water releases out of Parker Dam, which would result in the loss of valuable system storage.

Daily and hourly information on releases from Reclamation’s Colorado River dams is available at http://www.usbr.gov/lc/riverops.html.

Davis Dam and Parker Dam projected water release schedules can be found at http://www.usbr.gov/lc/region/g4000/hourly/DavisParkerSchedules.pdf.

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