91°F
weather icon Partly Cloudy

New deputy superintendent named at Lake Mead

Lake Mead National Recreation Area has named its new deputy superintendent, who will start work early next year.

Beth Ransel has been selected to the position, and she succeeds Patrick Gubbins, who retired from the National Park Service. Ransel is scheduled to report to Lake Mead National Recreation Area in early 2019.

Currently, she is the district manager for the Bureau of Land Management California Desert District in Moreno Valley, California, where she has been responsible for managing more than 11 million acres of public lands within nine counties and approximately 200 employees.

She has had oversight of recreation, wilderness, fire, law enforcement, archeology, wildlife, engineering, budget, property and administrative support, all attributes common to Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Additionally, she is familiar with the Las Vegas area, as she earned a bachelor of science degree in environmental studies and a master of science in environmental policy and management from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Additionally, she worked at UNLV as an adjunct instructor.

Ransel began her federal career with the BLM in 2003 and has had assignments in Las Vegas; Moab, Utah; Denver; Washington, D.C.; and Lander, Wyoming.

She was a program manager and assistant field manager in the Bureau of Land Management Las Vegas Field Office from 2009-2011, where she led a power project team and worked with the renewable energy coordination office on projects within the Las Vegas area.

From 2011-2013, she represented the BLM on the White House Interagency Rapid Response Team for Transmission and improved performance of federal permitting and review of infrastructure projects.

While in Utah from 2013-2016, she managed 1.8 million acres of public lands, overseeing 26 campgrounds and administering more than 300 special recreation permits annually. She also increased opportunities for public participation in decision-making processes.

Ransel has completed wilderness and law enforcement training and is a graduate of the Leadership Academy, Emerging Leaders Program and National Fire Management Leadership Course.

In addition to this appointment, Todd Suess, the superintendent at Mojave National Preserve and Castle Mountains National Monument, has been selected to serve as the acting superintendent at Lake Mead National Recreation Area. He is replacing Martha Lee, who was serving on a temporary detail after Lizette Richardson retired in August.

Suess began his land management career as a seasonal in four national parks and two National Forest Service areas. In 1991, he began his permanent federal career, with the Bureau of Land Management in Yuma, Arizona. In 1995, he returned to the National Park Service and worked in six national parks. He has served as a superintendent since 2001.

Suess has a bachelor of science degree from the University of Minnesota, with a major in resource and recreation management and a minor in forestry.

THE LATEST
Lagan’s sights set on Paris

In less than three weeks, Lexi Lagan will be competing in her second Summer Olympic Games with a collective cheer of support from her hometown of Boulder City.

But is there really a shortage?

Getting Boulder City out of a more than decade-long stretch where no city manager has lasted as long as it takes a student to graduate from BCHS was the overriding theme of discussion at this week’s city council meeting.

Council debates hiring city manager recruiter

Following a lengthy discussion, Mayor Joe Hardy summed things up Tuesday by saying, “Our No. 1 priority is to get someone who will stay.”

Sex-trafficked victims to have new home, school

Ideally, a school is far more than just four walls, a ceiling and some windows. It’s a place of learning, a place to feel safe, and a place to meet and bond with others.

Learn more about BC’s unofficial mascot

The bighorn sheep at Hemenway Park, on the outskirts of Boulder City, have become a tourist attraction as carloads, and often tour vans full of visitors, can been seen at the park each day.

City’s new fire structure in place

The Boulder City Fire Department is in the final stages of adding a structure, which will not only prepare its firefighters to a greater extent, but at the same time save taxpayer dollars.

Report made on strategic plan

Strategic plans are not anything new for Boulder City. A document developed in conjunction with an outside consultant outlining goals for the next five years has been around for at least a decade.

City, court extend personnel agreement

One could be excused for assuming that an item on the city council’s agenda for the June 25 meeting was somehow related to the concept of free speech if one had only read the agenda and none of the attachments. It was, after all, referred to as First Amendment.

Honoring first responders

Recently, the Boulder City Police and Fire departments held their annual awards night. For the fire department, Acting Chief Greg Chesser presented his Fire Chief Award to firefighter Brian Shea. For the police department, it gave out letters of commendation to several of its officers who assisted last December following the shooting death of three professors at UNLV. Those officers included Lt. Thomas Healing, sergeants John Glenn, Tiffany Driscoll and Christ Slack, detectives Mark Dubois, Bret Hood and officer Guy Liedkie. Pictured with Chief Tim Shea are Sgt. Driscoll and Lt. Healing. Driscoll also earned a second letter of commendation for her part in helping save the life of a Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department officer who suffered a seizure while the two were working an off-duty assignment at Allegiant Stadium.