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McManus, Woodbury advance

Mayor Rod Woodbury and City Councilman Kiernan McManus will face off for mayor in June’s municipal election as they earned the most votes in Tuesday’s primary election.

Neither, however, received enough votes to be elected outright.

Woodbury received the most with 1,465, and McManus received 1,409. Councilman Warren Harhay received 631 and was eliminated.

The vote count remains unofficial until Tuesday’s, April 9, City Council meeting, when the primary results will be canvassed.

Woodbury and McManus said they were pleased with the election and with the 33.72% voter turnout.

“I think it’s been a good campaign on everybody’s part,” Woodbury said.

“I’m glad to see the turnout we had,” McManus said. “There was quite an increase on election day.”

Woodbury congratulated everyone who participated and stuck their necks out in the race.

“Win or lose you have to have thick skin and love public service,” he said.

In moving forward to the general election, both candidates have plans on how they will continue their campaigns.

Woodbury said getting out the positive message of his campaign will not change, and he will continue to go door to door and talk to people face to face.

“We’ll certainly regroup and reassess, but that’s a constant in every election,” he added.

“I think it will be pretty much the same,” McManus said.

He also said he has a good group of volunteers who have helped his campaign be successful.

Despite losing, Harhay remained positive and excited about his role in city government.

“The voters have spoken and I have been remanded to the high honor as a Boulder City councilman,” he said. “Congratulation to the victors. I plan to continue to work for the betterment of our city and have some plans that I wish to turn into policy with the upcoming new council.”

Harhay also said his Coffee with a Councilman will continue and that he is looking forward to the council’s consideration of the citizen’s utility advisory commission at Tuesday’s, April 9, meeting as well as the upcoming LED light bulb exchange being implemented throughout the city.

“The campaign has now ended for me but has given me the opportunity to listen and learn from our citizens,” he added. “I wish to thank all that have supported me in my efforts. Now the voters will have additional tough decisions to make in the general election regarding Boulder City’s governance for the future.”

The general election will be held June 11. In addition to choices for mayor and City Council, there will be several ballot questions.

In light of the those ballot questions, McManus said he encourages people to “get out to vote.”

“I believe even more will come out in the general election,” he added.

Early voting for June’s election takes place from May 25 to June 7.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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