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Interior secretary unveils new trails

Updated October 28, 2020 - 2:58 pm

Boulder City locals and visitors have another reason to visit Lake Mead National Recreation Area, a newly designated water trail providing more access to the Nevada and Arizona shorelines of Lake Mohave and the Colorado River.

Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced the designation Oct. 22 at the park. It is part of 1,300 miles of national recreational trails in 25 different states recently added to the National Trails System.

“The Mohave National Water Trail begins where the Black Canyon Water Trail ends, providing water recreational opportunities … along the Colorado River,” he said.

According to the Department of the Interior, the water trail gives people more access to beaches, scenic desert areas and unique historic sites, including submerged cultural resources.

Lake Mead Superintendent Margaret Goodro said the new Mohave National Water Trail is now accessible to visitors.

The 76-mile trail begins at Eldorado Canyon, 13 miles south of Willow Beach, and continues south to the Laughlin bridge below Davis Dam.

The trail designation was made possible through the commitment of the Lower Colorado River Water Trail Alliance, which also was instrumental in getting the Black Canyon Water Trail established.

“The Lower Colorado River Water Trail Alliance is excited to hear that yet another section of the Colorado River in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area has received this prestigious designation. We hope that all the visitors to the recreation area and these water trails see the beauty and join us in becoming regular visitors and stewards of these great places,” said Rod Taylor, alliance member and vice president of Guest Services, which operates several marinas, resorts and campgrounds within the park.

“It’s fitting that we’re gathered here near Lake Mead … America’s first and largest national recreation area,” Bernhardt said. “This is our sixth-most visited park and that really is incredible with the challenges we’ve had as a country over the last several months. Our national parks and recreation areas have played an incredible role of providing solace, inspiration and respite, and I’m so glad we’re able to keep so many areas accessible to the American public.”

This new designation was part of the Great American Outdoors Act. The act established the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund that pays for deferred maintenance projects on federal lands.

Bernhardt said its establishment can also help bring park maintenance “up to snuff” to make the people’s experience better when visiting the different national parks and their new trails.

“That National Trails System is growing and that means our trails will be better managed and better protected for future generations,” he added.

Bernhardt also said these new trails show President Donald Trump’s commitment to conservation.

“I encourage Americans to get outside, enjoy our incredible public lands and visit a nearby national recreation trail,” he said. “Spanning more than 83,000 miles, larger than the interstate highway system, the National Trails System provides easy access to a wide variety of outdoor experiences. The Trump administration is committed to expanding public access to the outdoors so more Americans have the opportunity and ability to experience it in all of its splendor.”

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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