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City working to improve downtown streetscape

In an effort to better the look of the streetscape in Boulder City, the Public Works Department is working to replace all the street name signs in town.

According to Public Works Superintendent Gary Poindexter, the project is meant to improve the overall appearance of the streetscape and to make it easier to navigate and identify street names at intersections downtown.

“This goes in conjunction with the Wayfinding Signage Plan, which includes upgrading all regulatory signs, warning signs, guide signs and school zone signs to meet current Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices standards,” he said. “In addition, all trail signs, public facility signs (and) historic neighborhood signs will be updated to project a consistent image for the entire city.”

To complete the project, Public Works divided the town into nine sections. Currently, the project is in its third year, and Poindexter expects the sign replacements to take eight years total to finish.

“Materials for section 3 and 4 are ordered and scheduled to be installed this fall,” he added. “Section 5 material will be ordered in the spring.”

In terms of cost, so far each section has cost approximately $9,300.

Poindexter said that cost is based on the number of signs needed, and several of the upcoming sections will not require as many.

The money for sign replacement is coming from the RDA fund and street division operating budget.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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