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Census questionnaires mailed to homes

Paper questionnaires for the 2020 Census went out in the mail last week.

The U.S. Census Bureau said it mailed about 64 million questionnaires nationwide as it continues its efforts to count every American. Residents should have starting receiving them April 8.

The Census Bureau reported that 48.6 percent of the nation’s households had responded to the 2020 Census.

“If you’re among the nearly half of all the nation’s households that have responded already, thank you,” said Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham. “It has never been easier to respond on your own, whether online at https://2020census.gov, over the phone or by mail — all without having to meet a census taker. It’s something everyone can do while practicing social distancing at home to make a difference today, tomorrow and the next 10 years.”

According to the Census Bureau, Boulder City’s response is 54.8 percent, above the county’s and state’s response, which are 48.7 percent and 48.3 percent, respectively.

Boulder City’s self-response rate is below nearby Henderson’s rate of 57.2 percent, but above Las Vegas’ 50.6 percent response rate. It ranks fourth overall in the state for self-responding.

Some areas where census takers were originally going to hand-deliver forms will now receive a letter in the mail from the Census Bureau reminding them to participate. Even if households don’t receive a letter in the mail, the Census Bureau will drop off an invitation and paper form as soon as it is safe to do so. Census takers will also follow up with all households that do not respond.

Households receiving the paper questionnaire can still respond online or by phone, or they can return it by mail in the enclosed envelope.

The U.S. Constitution mandates a census of the population every 10 years. Census statistics are used to determine the number of seats each state holds in the U.S. House of Representatives and federal agencies use the results to determine how more than $675 billion in federal funds will be distributed annually to local communities, including money for public schools.

In early March, Mayor Kiernan McManus said the city and state loses about $20,000 in returned tax dollars for each person that is not counted.

“These dollars help fund our schools, programs for senior citizens and many other services,” he said.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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