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BCR launches E-edition

You can now read and see the Boulder City Review exactly as it appears in print no matter where you are in the world.

The Boulder City Review has launched an E-edition, a digitally scanned interactive version of the newspaper.

As a subscriber, you can log in anytime, from anywhere for full access to this new version of the paper. Plus, it can be accessed on your computer, tablet or cellphone.

Just like reading the print edition, you can scan pages, read headlines and see pictures.

Additionally, you can search for exactly what you’re looking for via the search feature, as well as find articles from past issues in our archives.

Once you’ve found the article you want to read, just click on the title to open it. From there, it can be read, shared or printed simply with a click of the mouse. You also can zoom in or zoom out.

The look of the E-edition has several viewing options. For example, you can look at single or double pages, fitting the pages to the width or height of your screen.

You can even download the application or a PDF for reading later when you have no internet connection.

And if you have any questions about how to use the E-edition, a quick and easy tutorial will key you in on all the features and options so you can tailor the look to exactly how you like to read the news.

Not only do you get access to all the news from Boulder City, you will be able to see all of the advertisements that are featured in the print edition.

Subscriptions to the E-edition are ideal for those who spend part of the year away from Boulder City or for those who move away but want to stay informed about what’s happening in town.

Current print subscribers will have access to the E-edition immediately by creating an account or logging into the Boulder City Review’s website, www.bouldercityreview.com.

If you’re not a subscriber, getting a subscription is easy. Just click on the link on our website.

An annual subscription to the E-edition costs the same $39 a year as a subscription to the print edition that is delivered to your home — and you never have to worry about finding a wet paper if the sprinklers come on or it rains.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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