74°F
weather icon Clear

We all can do more to keep children safe

I turn left on Adams Boulevard and quickly there they are, in vests with stop signs in hand. They remind me that kids are out and to keep my eyes open and speed down.

The 12 crossing guards that serve our community have always impressed me, as I have seen them interact with my children and others; they are always positive. They help children begin and end their day on a good note. My children have nothing but good things to say about the crossing guards. When asked their thoughts they say, “They are all really nice. My favorite is the older lady with the curly hair, she always asks us about our day, and we tell her about our weekends.”

These public servants are there every morning — cold, hot, rainy or otherwise — to ensure our children are safe. I didn’t realize until I started to learn a little about them that they are not employees of Clark County School District. These crossing guards are actually paid through the Boulder City Police Department, and I feel they are a very good investment of our city funds.

Every parent’s heart sank this Valentine’s Day as we learned about the mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. We can’t help but put ourselves in the place of those 17 parents who received the phone call that their child would not be coming home that day. That incident has refocused my thoughts on something that I often take for granted: the safety of my children.

The sad news for America is that the number of kids killed by firearms each year does not appear to be decreasing. The good news is that the number of children that are killed in traffic accidents, both as pedestrians and occupants, is. But even with the decrease, the reality is that the most likely weapon to kill one of my children is still a motor vehicle.

Even one child being killed, no matter the weapon, gun or vehicle, is too many and I believe we need to work together to find practical ways to further protect our children. And while I am not opposed to solutions that require Washington’s involvement, I am not optimistic that any action will either occur or necessarily will have the impact that we hope.

Whenever I feel helpless in a political debate, I try to step back and think, “What can I directly do to be a part of the solution?” So, what can we do to improve kid’s safety in Boulder City?

I recently tried to thank one of the crossing guards for the protection he provides our children. He said, “Well we try, but we can only do so much; we can’t stop people from racing 40 miles per hour in the school zones or being distracted on their cellphone.”

I realized there was something I can do. I can be safer, pay more attention, be a little more responsible with this 1,000-pound plus weapon I use to get around town in every day.

I hope we will have an open and honest debate on ways we can improve the safety of our children. But while we have the debate and are unclear on exactly what changes we can or will make, I hope we both show gratitude for those who, like the crossing guards, are already doing so much to keep our children safe and don’t forget to do the little practical things each day that can and will improve their safety.

Nathaniel Kaey Gee resides in Boulder City with his wife and six kids. He is a civil engineer by day and enjoys writing any chance he gets. You can follow his work on his blog www.thegeebrothers.com.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Appointment raises questions

Last week, City Council members terminated the employment contracts for City Manager Al Noyola and City Attorney Steve Morris.

Mail-in ballots problematic

If you don’t believe mail-in ballots are a problem, think again. My wife and I became permanent Boulder City residents when we moved from California five years ago. We own property here and have Nevada driver’s licenses. We have no connection to California whatsoever and haven’t for five years.

City must move forward in unity

What Boulder City needs right now is a giant bandage.

More than two parties needed to effect change

The first ballot I cast in a presidential election was in 1972 — Nixon versus McGovern. I also served as an election judge, which is what they were called in Illinois. In Nevada, the term is poll worker (also known as election board officer). Times were different then — no computers, no voting machines, only paper ballots in my precinct.

Importance of newspapers celebrated

Sunday marked the start of the 80th annual observance of National Newspaper Week.

Choice to make at poll obvious

To say I was taken aback by the first presidential debate would be a severe understatement. While all three debaters left much to be desired, I was stunned that pollster Frank Luntz, who watched with a cadre of unsure voters, tweeted, “This debate has actually convinced some undecided voters to not vote at all.”

Make your vote count

From the very beginning of our country, voting for those who will govern us has been an intrinsic principle.

Fight against virus must continue

As we enter into the fall season, the number of new COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations in Clark County has been decreasing gradually over the past few weeks. Gov. Steve Sisolak has issued new guidelines as a result that allow the few businesses still closed in Boulder City to reopen. The governor is closely following the advice from health experts when issuing the guidelines. Our city government is then following the guidelines to slow the spread of the virus.

What are you going to vote for?

I’m not asking “who” you are voting for. I’m asking “what” you voting for. When we cast our ballots this November, we won’t be casting our votes for an individual, even though it seems like it. We will be casting our votes for an ideal, a concept of democracy for our nation’s republic.

Congress has way to fix unemployment problems

Folks don’t like to face problems. They’re much easier to ignore. Everyone chooses. Face problems and find a solution or have them blow up in your face. Or, maybe you’ll get lucky and the problems vanish. Or, you carry them around and suffer the consequences day by day, usually for far too long.