Take a chance, meet someone new

One of the best parts of my job is meeting a variety of people.

It’s an integral part of what I do every day. Whether out in the community or fielding a phone call, being a journalist means interacting with others to get their stories told or report on what they are doing.

Journalists meet people experiencing the happiest days of their lives and the worst. Of course, there are lots of in between days, too.

In more than three decades of work, I have met thousands of people from all walks of life. I’ve spoken to children, those “just doing their jobs” and celebrities. The reality is that most are only “famous” to their families and close friends but they feel like a star when someone cares enough to ask them about their lives.

I have been fortunate enough that my work has brought some very special people into my life.

I have made life-long friends who I can chat with, bear my soul to and vent my frustrations without any repercussions. We can pick up the conversation as if no time had passed since our last visit even if the last time we spoke was really more than a year ago.

There are those who have become like family to me and my “real” relatives, joining us for joyous celebrations and sharing in our grief when tragedy hits. One couple became surrogate parents and I was as much a part of their family as they were of mine.

Work even introduced me to my husband and sparked our relationship past acquaintance and friend status to lifelong partners.

Although there are times when meeting people is also the worst part of what I do, the good people I meet far outnumber those who are not so good. Here, in Boulder City, that is especially true.

This became clearer to me in the past few weeks as I looked at the good volunteers are doing in the community.

They give countless hours of their time to places such as the senior center and hospital. They raise funds for religious organizations by selling pumpkins or manning thrift stores. They drive those who cannot drive themselves to doctors appointments.

Some specific instances include alumni from Boulder City High School raising funds at their class reunion to prevent people from going hungry. People working behind the scenes to ensure that this year’s holiday season is festive and bright through special events such as parades and snowball fights.

They do it because they care. They don’t seek any recognition. Not even from journalists just doing their jobs.

Today, one such volunteer, a charming woman who became a friend to me after I interviewed her about her efforts, will be recognized by the state for her work on behalf of veterans.

Listening to others, hearing their stories and sharing yours, can change one’s life. I see it every day.

You truly never know the impact you have on others, no matter how big or small your interaction with them is. All is takes is a chance meeting.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523.

Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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