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Letters to the Editor, Nov. 7

Need for volunteers missing

I am relatively new to Boulder City, having moved here from the East Coast about 18 months ago.

Beginning about three weeks ago, I emailed three Boulder City agencies (I even visited one of them) who indicate on their websites that they are in need of volunteers. I believe all three of these organizations receive federal funding.

Only one of the three eventually got back to me and even that person commenced to go on vacation and indicated that when she returned she would contact me (to be determined).

I guess the moral to the story is that Boulder City has all the volunteers it can handle. I suppose that’s good news.

Mike Keene

Animals must be protected

It seems to me that the Boulder City Horseman’s Association has a responsibility to all horse owners who board their horses there to spray “ag wash” over the entire compound and not just the common areas to prevent any further outbreaks (of equine herpesvirus). What good is it to just spray the common areas when there could be viruses all over the compound? Just spraying the common areas is not protecting the 500 horses that live there. Why do horse owners pay boarding fees anyway — for a safe environment for their animals.

Further prevention should require the owners of all new incoming horses to provide the association with a current health certificate before being allowed on the premises. Another preventative measure could be to remove any and all wood fencing and replace it with steel and clean up all areas. Every horse owner should keep their area clean at all times.

I find it puzzling that the (Boulder City Police Department) mounted patrol horses were removed from the compound beforehand so as not to contract the virus. What is wrong with this picture?

Sharon Teagarden

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