101°F
weather icon Clear

Letters to the Editor, Nov. 29

Defend your beliefs

In the mid-1970s when I was a young man attending college, I worked at the Sears store at the Genesee Valley mall in Flint Township, Michigan. In the retail trade, Sears was always considered reliable and trustworthy. Sears was a virtual icon that decorated our landscape for many decades, so it comes with some sadness that it is closing (many of) its doors.

Here is a little-known piece of trivia: Sears once had a radical activist working for them who is now a Boulder City resident: me.

I once had the daring of youth to circulate a petition throughout the store requesting there be no smoking on the sales floor. Now remember, this was in the 1970s, before we had legislation and other safeguards enacted to protect us against secondhand smoke. When I took my petition to the store manager’s office, he graciously put out his cigarette and acknowledged my petition, and that was all. No action whatsoever was taken.

My lengthy petition had no effect. Or did it? Today, we walk into stores and we take for granted that the air we breathe will be free from harmful secondhand smoke. But how many people will recall that it wasn’t always this way? It took pioneers like myself to take the risk of being fired in order to stand up for truth and justice.

Through the years I also fought the corporate behemoth on problems like excessive noise.

Sears never put up any plaque in honor of my services, yet there are countless people I’ve never met who have benefited by my efforts of so long ago. Each new generation must stand out and dare to speak up for truth.

Fare-thee-well, Sears. My efforts were not in vain.

Bobby Morrow

Commercials condone violence, not efficiency

This is an open letter to the Southern Nevada Water Authority board of directors.

When our country is continuously ripped with violence and senseless mass shootings, including the horrific Oct. 1, 2017, massacre on the Las Vegas Strip, I am making a plea to SNWA to discontinue the airing of its commercial that promotes violence to one’s neighbors.

The commercial(s) is the water conservation series “Don’t make us ask you again. It’s a desert out there.”

In one commercial, an elderly lady knocks on her neighbor’s door (where the lawn is being overwatered). When the male neighbor answers the door, the woman gives a swift kick to the man’s groin, sending him to the ground. Another commercial is where a small bichon frise dog violently attacks a neighbor, lunging at the man’s throat (for overwatering his lawn).

The message these commercials send is that it’s OK to use violence to get ones’ point across. I don’t believe it is an appropriate message to our community, especially from the SNW “Authority.”

I was never a fan of these commercials when they launched. Doing harm to a neighbor is not a way to build a community of love and tolerance. Adults and children see the message as, “Hey it’s OK to harm my neighbor if they don’t do what I asked them to do, the SNWA commercial shows it’s OK.”

I continue to see the commercial with the elderly lady attacking the neighbor. Why the commercial continues to air is beyond comprehension; it does not send a message of water conservation, but rather that it’s OK to do harm to another, especially if one has been warned … “Don’t make us ask you again…”

Following the airing of the commercial on Nov. 14, local Fox 5 reported a story on a road-rage incident that left a man dead. The policeman interviewed made a notable statement, “Turning to violence is not the answer.” Let’s follow his advice.

Mary Vail

THE LATEST
New law shapes golf course design

I like golf. While I was in college, I decided to take a class in golf – you could call it a “golf course” course. I figured it would be a great way to relax, enjoy nature, and (maybe) boost my grade point average at the same time! For a semester, I learned the basics: how to drive, chip, putt. It was enjoyable. Many of my classmates that semester had been golfing for years. They were better than me, but I was determined to get a good grade out of the class.

The art of communication in consciousness

For Memorial Day I am exploring human consciousness with you. Many misunderstandings have been fought over the lack of a mutual perspective among the parties involved. What better gift is there than one that assists in the art of communication? My work in formulating the discipline of Aquarian Theosophy has led me to the following understanding of humanities’ reality; consciousness is the basis of understanding.

Alumni events, marriage and a real Nazi

Ron’s column from a few weeks ago inspired me to tell a story about a weird event from my past. Mine is not as exciting as his in that there is no wrestler named Silo Sam. But there is at least one Nazi. And, no, not the current “I disagree with your politics so you are a Nazi” version. An actual card-carrying member of the party.

Las Vegas Veterans’ Memorial to Boulder City?

Veterans’ memorials can be found all over the Silver State. They are well deserved. They honor individuals who served the nation, and also commemorate battles and events regarding the many military anniversaries in Nevada.

City manager bids fond farewell

I may be leaving Boulder City, but it was not an easy decision. From the first time I came in and met the staff and community leaders, I saw a city filled with people who truly care about where they live and work. I am grateful for the opportunities I have had to work with some incredible people.

Is the grass always greener?

Many people in the past played a golf game to cement a business deal, didn’t they? They also played golf to socialize. Has Boulder City recognized lessening play on golf courses? Or, from another perspective, what happens when million-dollar homes are placed around our open space golf course with views of the McCullough Mountains? Do fewer people play golf on the Boulder Creek golf course?

Parting is such sweet sorrow

Shakespeare was the man when it came to comedy and tragedy. His ability to make people feel the intense emotions of the characters is still imitated today. The past few months have been filled with a bit of excited anticipation at City Hall as several longtime and high-level employees have found new roles in other acts. I’m here to borrow some Shakespearean lines, the first being from Ophelia, “We know what we are, but know not what we may be.” (Hamlet)

Me, my brother and Silo Sam

Recently, I’ve been enjoying watching shows on A&E related to professional wrestling back in the earlier days, with profiles on wrestlers I grew up watching as well as classic rivalries.