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Letters to the Editor, Jan. 17

We are ruled by monarchs

Dan Jensen does not seem to understand the type of government found in the United States. He believes that there are two types: a democracy and a republic. He blends them. A democracy is where the people directly wield sovereign power over governments. In a republic, the people chose representatives to exercise governmental power. The Constitution guarantees a republican form of government for the states (See Article IV, Section 4). The problem is the United States does not have either of these forms of government.

We now have a monarchy. Kings and queens populate all levels of government — federal, state and local — and their whims determine what the citizens may or may not do. The people are not sovereigns of this nation; we are its subjects.

If you doubt this, read the Declaration of Independence where a long list of abuses are presented. To name just a few: He erected a multitude of new offices and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people. Who has not been harassed by our present governments.

He has subjected us to a jurisdiction foreign to our Constitution. All three levels of government ignore the requirements found in our Constitution, charters, etc.

He imposed taxes without our consent. Which government has not taxed the citizens of this nation for noncitizen use? The United States of America was created for it citizens and not as a nursemaid for every person in the world. This taxation is without our consent.

To answer Jensen’s last question. Subjects never get to tell kings and queens what is best for the people.

Del Kidd

Basic water fee too high

$37.56 is the base charge just to have a water meter. That is too much for the budget conscious or fixed-income residents. One Colorado River city charges $5.11 for the meter. Usurious charges for the access to the absolutely most important commodity for life is cruel.

Does anyone recall residents approving the city to abandon the contract and water pumps at the base of the dam? We ended up with an outrageously expensive substitute.

Our city has been blessed with terrific income from solar leases — more than $30 million a year. About a third of that goes to the general fund. Historically, the general fund is covered by property and other taxes. Our property taxes have been stagnant. Vacant properties have water available, if needed. With no meter, there is no contribution to the Southern Nevada Water Authority by vacant properties.

In summary, the cost for a water meter is $450 a year. That needs to be cut and the cost for life-required water usage be increased. More of the solar money should be used for the water indebtedness for our residents.

Please keep the $37.56 monthly base charge in mind when voting.

Jack Belleau and

John Blewett

Editor’s note: According to Lisa LaPlante, communications manager, the city receives $10,032,937 a year in rents and royalties from its leases.

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