89°F
weather icon Clear

Letters to the Editor, Dec. 6

Voters should approve expense for new aquatic center

Ninety million dollars — $90,000,000 — is the cost for the new aquatic center. This includes the just revised upward price from $40 million to $50 million for the preferred design and the interest of $40 million for the 30 year bond at 4.5 percent. Boulder City has a population of 16,000 people. This is ridiculous.

Roger Hall, Boulder City’s director of Parks and Recreation, stated at the aquatic center public meeting (Nov. 28) that an aquatic center has a lifespan of 25 years. This means that the new aquatic center will be obsolete in 25 years, but there will still be five more years of debt to pay: $3 million per year. That’s very bad financial planning.

I use the existing aquatic center very often for lap swimming. It needs lots of repairs. An investment of less than $5 million would totally restore the filtration system to code standards and eliminate the corrosive chlorine vapors; the pool could be rebuilt to the 7-foot depth needed for swim team competitions; the erratic shower temperature control valves could be replaced; and other needed repairs made.

Where is the money? Interstate 11 has caused a drop in tax revenue and some businesses are leaving Boulder City. School enrollment is decreasing. Another recession is predicted by 2020.

The cost of living and running our city is more expensive every year.

I would love to enjoy swimming at a new aquatic center. But as a Boulder City property owner and taxpayer I regard this $90 million expense as a fantasy wish that will have a terrible hangover — even worse than the Boulder City golf course fiasco council approved.

The Boulder City Council should put this on the ballot for a direct referendum vote.

Fred Dexter

Parks should create habitats for insects

The New York Times magazine’s Nov. 27 issue has an article that causes me to take a fresh look at how Boulder City parks are landscaped. Typically park lawns are mowed to their edges so that they look “nice.”

Some borders of a meter wide or so should be left not mowed to provide habitats for insects, spiders, etc. Food is then available for birds, reptiles and rodents. In the case of Hemenway (Valley) Park, a meter-wide strip from the toilets all the way around to the back of the tennis courts could be left unmowed. An interesting plaque could be set up to explain to visitors the reason for the unmowed strip.

Gary Vesperman

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Smart development key to sustainable future

I commend my friend and colleague Mayor (Kiernan) McManus for his comments in the Boulder City Review on Sept. 1 regarding his focus on conservation to best serve the residents of Boulder City. Together, our cities have a long-standing commitment to conservation and sustainability.

Solutions to nation’s woes just take action

What if you had solutions to a multitude of problems? Would you share what you knew or would you hesitate because the facts were contrary to the status quo?

Terrorists killed more than people

Sept. 11 changed us. And not necessarily for the better.

Dont let city become ‘Pothole Paradise’

Two years ago at a public event, a friend got in my face and in an uncharacteristic, agitated voice said, “Fix my street!” Initially I thought he was joking. But after two attempts to change the subject, I realized he wasn’t laughing.

Court of public opinion too quick to judge

Most people know me for my former Throwback Thursday columns with the Boulder City Review and some people may know of me from my failed run for City Council. What people don’t know, however, is that I used to work for actor Johnny Depp through a contract I had running events at multiple properties on the Las Vegas Strip. I was Mr. Depp’s private dining planner for all of his Las Vegas trips, including events with his family.

Relax, it’s Labor Day

Monday is Labor Day, and it’s somewhat ironic that a day devoted to celebrating the American workforce is a day that most of us strive to do anything but work.

Options for conservation must be explored

Fall weather will be a welcome change in the next few weeks, it has been a hot summer. Some of the hottest temperatures on record for Southern Nevada. And most of those records have been over the past few years. We can look at the changes in water levels at Lake Mead and know that things are very different from any other time in our lifetimes.

Agostini, Eagles Closet help those in need

Since the new school year began at the beginning of the month, students and staff members at Boulder City High School have made a variety of changes to help ensure their health and welfare in the wake of COVID-19.

Water’s low cost makes it expendable

Water is essential to life. Humans and every living species can go without many things but not without water; yet many take water for granted. We water our lawns, fill our swimming pools, wash our cars, take long showers, hose down our driveways and rarely even think about the costs involved. Why? Because water is too convenient and, most importantly, inexpensive.

City long devoted to conservation, environmental issues

The water level at Lake Mead fell to 1,068 feet in July 2021. That is the lowest level since the lake was first filled following the Hoover Dam’s dedication in 1935. This month, the federal government has declared a water shortage on the Colorado River for the first time, triggering cutbacks in water allocations to surrounding states from the river.