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Hot beverages soothe the soul

If you are familiar with the television show “The Big Bang Theory,” you are acquainted with the character Sheldon Cooper, a physicist who works at the California Institute of Technology.

Sheldon, so expertly played by Jim Parsons, who has won four Emmy Awards for his portrayal, is extremely awkward in most situations, especially those that cause him to interact with other people. He has rituals and habits that he finds very difficult to deviate from, and others can’t always comprehend his motives.

He is extremely intelligent and cannot understand the often irrational and emotional actions of others. This Spock-like logic makes him the straight man among his group of nerdy and equally socially awkward friends.

While his (and his friends’) ineptness makes for good comedy, you wouldn’t think they have any practical applications for those of us in the real world.

But in between those moments that you wouldn’t want to experience yourself, there are a few nuggets of great wisdom that show Sheldon’s true compassion for others.

One of things he does when faced with an especially awkward predicament that requires comforting another person who is in distress is pour them a hot beverage. True to his quirky personality, this is not optional.

Of course, the result is that after a hot beverage has been served, they are generally able to resolve the issue at hand (thanks to the magic of a 30-minute sitcom).

In my experience, I, too, have found that a hot beverage is a good conductor to solving issues or, at the very least, making them less stressful. A good cup of tea after a long day makes me slow down and relax.

And I’m not the only one who finds this to be true.

Recently, I spotted a post on social media from a Boulder City resident named Corrie, who claimed that she made the best coffee in town and invited others to come join her for a cup. So I did.

Although I don’t drink coffee, she had alternative hot beverages available, and they provided a soothing segue into a morning session where she and a few ladies discussed issues that were bothering them and problems they had encountered. Around her dining table, the discussion bounced from topic to topic, serving as a sounding board to some issues while offering solutions to others.

Corrie has been a resident of Boulder City only since February, and her coffee sessions have helped her make friends in the community. They are something she has done in one form or another for a number of years wherever she has lived.

She home-schools her children and found that inviting other mothers over to her house gave them an opportunity to share what was going on in their lives and let the children play together.

It’s an idea that has served her well and continues to do so.

When I visited, there were a couple of young mothers who had brought their children over to play, along with a woman closer to my age whose children were already on their own. Each of us added a unique perspective to the conversation.

It was a warm and welcoming respite from the craziness of life.

Corrie aspires to open a real coffee shop in town one day, and I have no doubt it will become a gathering spot just like the one in her kitchen. Friends will discuss their hopes and dreams, problems and solutions, all while enjoying a delicious hot beverage. The only thing that will be missing is a catchy theme song.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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