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Harhay’s independence, thoughtfulness an asset for city

Updated February 9, 2018 - 10:03 am

In April 2014, Warren Harhay found out some bad news: A diagnostic procedure he had related to his heart had the unfortunate side effect that led to the failure of his kidneys and he would be on dialysis for the rest of his life.

“Many people on dialysis give up, or feel their life is over because they are chained to the machine,” he said.

So he set out to prove that dialysis didn’t mean you had to give up, if not to others, at least to himself.

While that was not the only motivation, it was part of what led him to run for City Council in 2017. He is the first to admit that his health has slowed him down from the pace he’d like to be at, but, despite this, he has been a productive and important player in the current council.

In fact, when I think of people I would like to see run as mayor, Councilman Harhay is one of the first that comes to mind.

Why?

Transparency is something we all want in our political leaders. It’s something they all promise to provide, and Harhay has, more than anyone else, found ways to deliver on that promise. Each significant vote he has made has either been proceeded or followed by a Facebook post on what led him to that vote.

Doing such write-ups are risky. It opens up the door for everyone to pick holes in your logic or point out additional things you should’ve considered. But he is willing to take the risk because he truly has nothing to hide and doesn’t mind learning from those who disagree with him.

He also brings to the table a unique independence. One of the unique things about Councilman Harhay is his campaign for office was 100 percent self-funded. All political leaders and candidates say they cannot be bought, but no one can say it with as much authority as Harhay.

And his voting record reflects this. His votes, while well thought out, fall on both sides of the Boulder City political spectrum. He will do what he feels is best for the city even when it may be unpopular with a specific group or voter.

He enjoys interacting with the public and just being a part of moving the city forward. You can see it when he is with people. He enjoys discussing the issues. He enjoys being with citizens, and he even enjoys listening to those who disagree with him. This is a rare trait and perhaps one of the most important when it comes to being in local political office.

But what about his health? While no one wants to make health or age a big issue, in reality it does matter. This, of course, is why President Donald Trump was so anxious for his doctor to publicly proclaim him “fit for office.” And the Harhay we have today is not the same young man who fell in love with and moved to our small town in 1982. Then again, that Harhay lacked 36 years of experience that the current man brings to the table.

He has shown that despite some physical setbacks he can and will perform, and I would say that whether or not he feels physically up to the job is up to him. But if he does feel up to it, Harhay would give all of us another good option to be our next mayor.

Nathaniel Kaey Gee resides in Boulder City with his wife and six kids. He is a civil engineer by day and enjoys writing any chance he gets. You can follow his work on his blog www.thegeebrothers.com.

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