44°F
weather icon Clear

Council lifts veil on selection process

Congratulations are in order for Boulder City’s newest council member, Judith Hoskins, as well as to existing members of the City Council for how they selected her.

Transparency and openness ruled at Monday’s special meeting.

Community residents had ample opportunity to learn about those seeking to complete the term of the late Councilman Warren Harhay.

Not only were applications, resumes and letters of recommendation included in the agenda packet, which was available online before the meeting, anyone who wanted to speak was given five minutes of time during the public comment session that kicked off the meeting. And any electronic correspondence that came in late was printed and made available to the public at the meeting.

Then, after residents and individuals interested in the council seat spent 30 minutes touting the qualifications of the 10 people who sought to serve, the four sitting council members also expressed why they made the nominations they did.

Even after the vote was split between the two nominees for the spot, Hoskins and Judy Dechaine, efforts were made to show that the selection process was as fair.

The names of both nominees were clearly shown to those in the council chambers before the slips of paper were placed in a vase for one to be chosen. Once Mayor Kiernan McManus selected one of the pieces of paper, he made sure that everyone could see whose name appeared.

It was a vast improvement from the process in July when Councilwoman Tracy Folda was selected.

Now that the council is complete again, it’s time for it to get on with business and making good decisions to benefit the community.

There are some concerns that all five of the council members were affiliated with and endorsed by Boulder City Community Alliance, a private Facebook group of people who aim to “advance the public welfare by ensuring that Boulder City is maintained as a healthy, spacious, clean, well balanced, carefully-controlled community primarily by preserving its small-town historic atmosphere and character and avoidance of uncontrolled and rapid growth.”

While we think it’s great that residents are taking an interest in their community — and doing something about it — the group represents about only 10 percent of the population. We hope that council members will consider the other 90 percent of the residents when making decisions for the city’s future.

It was how Councilman Harhay, who also had been endorsed by the alliance, governed. Hopefully, his thoughtful approach to every issue will provide guidance for their actions.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Take charge of your health

An old joke says it’s always a good day when you wake up and can look down at the grass instead of looking up at it.

Is strong conviction worth losing it all?

Did you ever think about putting your life on the line to work for something and lose all you’ve got in the process?

Like songs, cars hold special memories

One of the many attractions in Boulder City are the car shows in the park. These gatherings are terrific for the automobile enthusiast and, frankly, the nonenthusiast, too, with everything on display from muscle cars to European classics.

Technology paves way for future lifestyles

The annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas has been making headlines for the past couple of days as new and future gadgets and devices are introduced.

U.S. must protect its people, interests

President Donald Trump made the correct and timely decision last week to eliminate Iranian general Soleimani and his cohorts. Had Trump not taken action, more Americans and Iraqi civilians would have been killed at the hands of this modern-day Stalin.

Simple, familiar problem has no simple solution

Anyone who has tried to enter Boulder City’s post office with packages in their hands knows what it is like to juggle them, or wait for a nice person to help with the two sets of doors — which, of course, have an awkward space in between them. And don’t forget the third set inside, if you want to reach the part of the building to actually mail stuff at the counter.

Too many dates gets confusing

And so it begins. Today is the second day of the new year and it’s time for me to get my calendars in order. Yes, there’s supposed to be an “s” after calendar, because one just never seems to be enough.

New year brings many reasons to celebrate

Happy new year, Boulder City! As we enter the new decade, I would like to remind the residents of our great town that we will be celebrating a birthday on Jan. 4. It is the 60th anniversary of the incorporation of Boulder City as a municipality.

Building’s moniker traced to its slogan

As deadline approached, Amy reminded me that the two of us had frequently puzzled over that long, old, cream-colored building on the west side of U.S. Highway 93 just north of Buchanan Boulevard: the one with “Safety First” emblazoned in big white letters at the roof line. What was that all about?