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Place of shelter: Animal control ready to help owners with pets

With many things to worry about due to COVID-19, caring for your pets if you fall ill is not one of them thanks to the Boulder City Animal Shelter.

“We have protocols in place if a citizen becomes ill. … We are willing and prepared to house animals if their owners go into the hospital,” said Animal Control Supervisor Ann Inabnitt.

For any animal that comes to stay at the shelter, Inabnitt said they have a quarantine area for when they first get there. Staff also bathes them and make sure they are healthy.

“We’ve always done that and we will continue to do it,” she said.

Currently, the shelter does not have an excess number of animals due to the virus. Inabnitt said they just have those that have been abandoned. In case that changes or if the shelter has to close because of COVID-19, Inabnitt said she has a list of people who could foster animals.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Paris-based World Organization for Animal Health, there is no evidence that animals can spread COVID-19 to people. However, if someone who is sick has to take care of their pets, he or she should still follow the CDC’s guidelines for slowing the spread of the virus and wash their hands before and after any interaction with their animals.

Inabnitt said she and the shelter’s staff are also following the health and safety protocols by wearing masks, gloves and abiding by social distancing rules to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The shelter, 810 Yucca St., is closed to visitors.

With Nevadans having to stay at home as much as possible to prevent the spread, Inabnitt said right now is a good time for owners to work on obedience training with their pets.

“They’re home all day and should reap the benefits of it,” she said.

She also said it’s a good time to brush dogs outside because the wind will take the fur, and birds will build nests from it.

Even though it is closed, the shelter is still accepting food donations. Inabnitt said those who want to donate can call the shelter to set up a time to drop it off. They can leave it outside the facility, and the staff will wipe off the bags before bringing them inside.

“Donations have been incredible,” she added.

With so much food coming in, Inabnitt said they are giving a lot of it to Emergency Aid of Boulder City to give out to people who need it for their pets.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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