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Moves complicate visitation, custody issues

This week I continue on the topic of child custody and some common issues. In almost all states, the relocating parent is required to make a proposed visitation schedule, including the times and places for visitation with the noncustodial parent in the new location. Often this includes extended access times during major holidays, spring breaks and summer months.

In addition, because child custody relocation may invoke a substantial change in circumstances, the parties may also need to seek a court modification of custody or visitation order. In certain circumstances, such as joint-custody situations, a court may need to reassess child custody between the parties altogether and suggest that the parent who doesn’t relocate take physical custody of the child to maintain as much stability as possible.

In terms of increased travel costs, some states require a 50-50 split in increased fees while other states may require the party who is moving to incur most of the transportation costs related to visitation.

There are a number of reasons why you may want to move with your child, but when there are child custody orders in place your freedom to relocate can be restricted. If you’d like to relocate and aren’t sure how it will impact your child custody orders, now is the time to get legal advice.

Virtual visitation, as the term implies, is a form of child visitation that requires the use of technology to keep in contact with a child. This type of visitation may include email, video conferencing, video mail and instant messaging. It typically is detailed as part of a parenting agreement or child custody order.

Internet visitation or electronic visitation is still relatively new but growing in popularity as video calling becomes more the norm. Virtual visitation may also be an option in many states that don’t yet have specific laws on the books. Virtual visitation laws are meant to supplement, not replace, traditional in-person parent-time. These laws generally require each parent to permit and encourage virtual visits; make them reasonably available; and allow uncensored communication with the child.

Jan. 30. Disturbance: The resident is not a fan of the new technology to check the aging electrical system in the area of Utah Street and Avenue L at 7:15 a.m.

Family disturbance: The morning isn’t starting out well for these two at 8:45 a.m. in the 1300 block of Darlene Way.

Thought for the day: Maybe everyone got up on the wrong side of the bed today.

Jan. 31. Suspicious: Several callers report a car abandoned in the travel lane and witnessing the driver leap from the car and run away leaving the door open at 6:02 p.m. in the 800 block of Buchanan Boulevard.

Reckless: The caller states the vehicle coming into town is beyond reckless and they will gladly sign a citizen’s arrest at 9:57 p.m. in the 1600 block of Boulder City Parkway.

Thought for the day: Just because there isn’t a cop around doesn’t mean there are no repercussions.

Feb. 1. Disturbance: The bonfire would be fine at a Burning Man event but not so great in the backyard of a residence at 7:14 a.m. in the 1200 block of Potosi Street.

Suspended driver’s license: The driver is cited for driving while suspended but the outstanding warrants from another jurisdiction affirm it’s not the first time at 10:21 p.m. in the area of Avenue G and Adams Boulevard.

Thought for the day: The driver gets a personal escort to the meet-up location and a room with a view courtesy of a neighboring jurisdiction.

Feb. 2. Destruction of property: The dispute between neighbors seems to have gone from throwing barbs to throwing eggs at 6:31 p.m. in the 500 block of Utah Street.

DUI with accident: Sometimes the pain from a rollover comes much later in the process at 8:17 p.m. in the area of mile marker 42 northbound U.S. Highway 95.

Thought for the day: The cost of a good time can be calculated by the total for legal, mechanical and medical expenses.

Feb. 3. DUI: The nightly quick one turns into a long one and the cost of a tank of gas goes up exponentially at 1:29 a.m. in the 1600 block of Boulder City Parkway.

Disabled: The vehicle looks a little new for breaking down at 9:07 p.m. in the area of Interstate 11 and Buchanan Boulevard.

Thought for the day: The gallon of gas and call-out fee reminds the driver not to question the fuel light on the dash.

Feb. 4. Reckless: The citizen follows at a distance and is happy to sign the citation for a misdemeanor committed not in the officer’s presence at 12:48 p.m. in the area of mile marker 8 on northbound I-11.

Parking: Vehicles are parking on a private road and driveway as they drop off and pickup kids from school at 2:32 p.m.

Thought for the day: Residents are responsible for the care and upkeep of private access roads. Blocking driveways and leaving trash has caused more than a few hard feelings.

Feb. 5. Petty theft: The resident learns the ladder is missing at just the time it is needed at 8:48 a.m. in the 1400 block of Monterey Drive.

Suspicious: The caller states the man is holding a running garden hose, throwing trash and screaming at 11:46 a.m. in the 800 block of Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: Starting a small cleaning business should include permission from the property owner, something to clean and a business plan.

Call of the week. See person: The subject is in the lobby and has asked to speak to a policeman on the best way to become the sheriff. The person is given information on the law enforcement academy, post standards and referred to Metropolitan Police Department in Las Vegas for specific information on how to proceed from civilian life to the head of county law enforcement at 4:24 p.m. Feb. 1 in the 1000 block of Arizona Street.

Tina Ransom is a dispatcher with Boulder City Police Department. She is coordinator of the Boulder City Citizen’s Academy.

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