Changes on tap for power allocation from Hoover Dam

Southern Nevada’s power will be dispersed a bit differently in 2017.

More than a few entities will be receiving power from Hoover Dam, thanks to the Hoover Power Allocation Act. Normally, these entities would get electricity from NV Energy, which powers most of the Las Vegas Valley, according to Jayne Harkins, Colorado River Commission executive director.

Harkins said the new allocations throughout the valley will cause Boulder City to lose a little bit of the power it receives from the dam, but the change will not be dramatic.

NV Energy, according to Harkins, receives 2 percent of its power from the commission, which has a contract with Western Power Administration. The rest of the power comes from various power plants throughout the county.

According to the Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada receives approximately 25 percent of the electricity generated at Hoover Dam. The dam also powers California and Arizona.

The Hoover Power Allocation Act, which was signed into law in 2011, ensures that renewable electricity from Hoover Dam will power Nevada until at least 2067.

“This news means that Nevada’s oldest renewable energy project will deliver a new round of benefits to the Silver State,” said U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev. “The benefits from this announcement are the result of years of work to pass the Hoover Power Allocation Act.

“I was proud to join President (Barack) Obama in 2011 when my legislation was signed into law. It guarantees that Nevada will continue to reap its (Hoover Dam) benefits for another 50 years,” he said.

Contact reporter Steven Slivka at sslivka@bouldercityreview.com. Follow him on Twitter @StevenSlivka.

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