99°F
weather icon Clear

Changes on tap for power allocation from Hoover Dam

Southern Nevada’s power will be dispersed a bit differently in 2017.

More than a few entities will be receiving power from Hoover Dam, thanks to the Hoover Power Allocation Act. Normally, these entities would get electricity from NV Energy, which powers most of the Las Vegas Valley, according to Jayne Harkins, Colorado River Commission executive director.

Harkins said the new allocations throughout the valley will cause Boulder City to lose a little bit of the power it receives from the dam, but the change will not be dramatic.

NV Energy, according to Harkins, receives 2 percent of its power from the commission, which has a contract with Western Power Administration. The rest of the power comes from various power plants throughout the county.

According to the Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada receives approximately 25 percent of the electricity generated at Hoover Dam. The dam also powers California and Arizona.

The Hoover Power Allocation Act, which was signed into law in 2011, ensures that renewable electricity from Hoover Dam will power Nevada until at least 2067.

“This news means that Nevada’s oldest renewable energy project will deliver a new round of benefits to the Silver State,” said U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev. “The benefits from this announcement are the result of years of work to pass the Hoover Power Allocation Act.

“I was proud to join President (Barack) Obama in 2011 when my legislation was signed into law. It guarantees that Nevada will continue to reap its (Hoover Dam) benefits for another 50 years,” he said.

Contact reporter Steven Slivka at sslivka@bouldercityreview.com. Follow him on Twitter @StevenSlivka.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
News Brief, July 18

Lake Mead holding photo contest

Natural Beauty

Hali Bernstein Saylor/Boulder City Review

Star Power

Hali Bernstein Saylor/Boulder City Review

Visitors to Lake Mead boost area economy by $336 million

Almost 8 million people visited Lake Mead National Recreation Area in 2018 and spent approximately $336 million in the park’s local gateway communities, which includes Boulder City, according to a recent report from the National Park Service.

 
Drought pact signed

Top water officials from across the Southwest gathered at the Hoover Dam on Monday to celebrate the completion of emergency drought plans for the Colorado River.

Lake Mead rangers sent to patrol Mexico border

Several park rangers who normally patrol public land near Boulder City and Las Vegas have been dispatched to the U.S.-Mexico border in recent months under a surge program adopted by the Trump administration last year.

Park service aims to increase accessibility at Lake Mead

The National Park Service is seeking public comment on a plan that provides recommendations to improve accessibility of visitor services at Lake Mead National Recreation Area.