89°F
weather icon Clear

Changes on tap for power allocation from Hoover Dam

Southern Nevada’s power will be dispersed a bit differently in 2017.

More than a few entities will be receiving power from Hoover Dam, thanks to the Hoover Power Allocation Act. Normally, these entities would get electricity from NV Energy, which powers most of the Las Vegas Valley, according to Jayne Harkins, Colorado River Commission executive director.

Harkins said the new allocations throughout the valley will cause Boulder City to lose a little bit of the power it receives from the dam, but the change will not be dramatic.

NV Energy, according to Harkins, receives 2 percent of its power from the commission, which has a contract with Western Power Administration. The rest of the power comes from various power plants throughout the county.

According to the Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada receives approximately 25 percent of the electricity generated at Hoover Dam. The dam also powers California and Arizona.

The Hoover Power Allocation Act, which was signed into law in 2011, ensures that renewable electricity from Hoover Dam will power Nevada until at least 2067.

“This news means that Nevada’s oldest renewable energy project will deliver a new round of benefits to the Silver State,” said U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev. “The benefits from this announcement are the result of years of work to pass the Hoover Power Allocation Act.

“I was proud to join President (Barack) Obama in 2011 when my legislation was signed into law. It guarantees that Nevada will continue to reap its (Hoover Dam) benefits for another 50 years,” he said.

Contact reporter Steven Slivka at sslivka@bouldercityreview.com. Follow him on Twitter @StevenSlivka.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Plan to extend I-11 omits Lake Mead option

As transportation officials mull the future of the important Interstate 11 build-out, one option is now off the table.

Lake bans pool toys

As the Labor Day weekend approaches, Lake Mead National Recreation Area is encouraging visitors to leave their pool toys at home. In the interested of public safety, the use of inflatable and noninflatable items intended for use in swimming pools have been prohibited.

New plan slows Lake Mead decline by paying farms not to plant crops

Officials in Lower Colorado River Basin states want to slow the decline of Lake Mead’s water levels over the next few years by paying Southern California farmers not to plant crops.

Gould to head bureau’s lower Colorado region

The Bureau of Reclamation has a new full-time regional director for its Lower Colorado River Basin. Jaci Gould, who has been with the bureau since 1992, said she was “honored” to be selected to this position.

Coalition urges protection for shrinking Colorado River

A group that included environmentalists, elected leaders and officials from business and agriculture gathered July 15 to put forth a slate of demands for a new approach to managing the Colorado River.

Lake facing record low

Lake Mead’s water level this week is projected to match its lowest point since the reservoir was formed in the 1930s, federal officials said Tuesday, June 7.

Launch ramps to be affected by lower lake levels

Visitors to Lake Mead National Recreation Area are being advised that lower water levels expected during the next several years will impact water access points and boat launch areas.

Lake Mead gains favor among visitors

More than 8 million people visited Lake Mead National Recreation Area last year, moving it to the fifth most visited National Park Service site in the country.