102°F
weather icon Clear

Take Beatles’ message to heart

All you need is love.

That message, delivered by The Beatles in their hit song in 1967, reverberated throughout St. Andrew Catholic Community on Monday night as people of many faiths came to honor the lives lost exactly a year ago during the mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas.

They came to remember loved ones, friends, friends of friends and those they never knew. No one was completely unscathed or unaffected by the event that happened that day. Or by the outpouring of love and support that unfolded in the days after.

No longer were these nameless or faceless victims of some faraway crime. It was here, in our backyard. We met each of the 58 people who lost their lives through a touching video tribute. There they were, in happier times — smiling, laughing and holding onto loved ones.

We also learned about their families and how they were helped in the days after the shooting, as well as how the wounded gathered the resources they needed to return home and start the healing process, physically and spiritually.

Brian Scroggins of Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster spoke about the Family Assistance Center and the work it did arranging flights home, bringing in a temporary department of motor vehicles to help people get driver’s licenses and providing an avenue to meet with attorneys.

It accepted donations to provide nourishment and essentials to those who needed them. And what couldn’t be used by the victims or their families were donated to local shelters.

One woman drove from San Diego to deliver 60 teddy bears, he said. A church brought in 500 sandwiches. Those who worked in Orlando’s resilience center to help victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting came or called.

And if they just needed someone to hold their hand and cry with them, he did that, too.

In all, 4,356 people were helped during a three-week period.

Even after years of training to handle emergencies and countless hours helping others, Scroggins said the shooting was unlike anything he had experienced. It left an indelible mark on his life.

He now makes time each day to make sure he does something good and relishes the time he has with his family.

“I hug my kids a bit tighter. I kiss my wife a bit longer,” he said.

Treasure those moments was his unspoken message. No one knows what tomorrow will bring.

The memorial ended with the church’s bells tolling 58 times, once for each of the victims. No one made a sound as the sonorous peals echoed through the sanctuary for 9 minutes and 11 seconds. Was it coincidence that the ringing lasted that long, reminding us of another day that will be forever etched into our memories? Maybe. Divine intervention? Perhaps.

Though there isn’t anything that can be done to bring them back, we can do our best to never forget them and work together to conquer the evil in our world that prompted one man to take such an action.

“Where do we go from here?” That was the question asked by the Rev. Sandy Johnson of Boulder City United Methodist Church.

There is no clear-cut answer, she said, but added we can feel hopeless or seek out hope and work together.

“Love one another to triumph over evil. … love is the antidote to evil.”

It seems John, Paul, George and Ringo had it right all those years ago. You can get by with a little help from your friends.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Never miss a chance to learn from others

As human beings, we are not infallible and are prone to making mistakes. While perfection is a great goal, no matter how hard we strive, it is nearly impossible to achieve.

Nation needs more understanding, fewer guns

With the Fourth of July fresh in our minds, the country is still charged with patriotic pride — and that’s great. We are a first-world country. That is something to be grateful for.

Education about economy critical for coming election

For the first time in 24 years, I felt like a stranger in Boulder City. In the Damboree parade, I carried a banner for a political candidate, along with two other city residents. The three of us have lived in Boulder City for 68 years collectively. We know a lot of people, yet we felt like outsiders, looking into a crowd of folks who were unfamiliar to us.

Letters to the Editor, July 18

Historic preservation planner vital to city’s vision

Transparency seems AWOL

Tuesday night’s selection of a new council member to fill the seat vacated by Kiernan McManus when he was elected mayor certainly raises some eyebrows.

Gravity always wins

Fall is just around the corner.

City played role early in DiCaprio’s career

I was on Facebook recently when Boulder City resident Samantha Foster shared a video showing 2016 Academy Award winning actor Leonard DiCaprio cruising through our town. The 1995 Japanese commercial, which can be found on YouTube.com, has DiCaprio toting a Honda Civic as he and co-star Yasuko Matsuyuki briefly explore Boulder City and the surrounding desert.

Letters to the Editor

Politics, holiday parades should be kept separate

City makes the Fourth fabulous

Today is a day of great significance in our nation. It’s America’s birthday, the celebration of our declaration of independence from England.

Boulder City’s spirit shines brightly

Words cannot express my gratitude for the involvement and support of many of you during the campaign and election process. I am honored to have been elected as your mayor, and I look forward to the opportunity to continue to serve our great community.