99°F
weather icon Clear

Patience needed to complete street project

And so it begins. On Monday, crews began the first stage for the revamping of Boulder City Parkway.

The $17.5 million project will “complete” the street by adding safety features along with elements to make it more aesthetically pleasing — in other words, make it more beautiful.

Additionally, crews will be making improvements to the street itself, which should definitely please drivers as the end result should make for smoother sailing as people head in and out of town.

The project is scheduled to take 305 days, about 10 months, which, if it’s anything like other construction projects, will likely take longer and feel much more like 10 years.

Fortunately, it’s being built in 10 phases to reduce the impact of construction on traffic along the stretch. A map shows the work being limited to small segments of the highway on one side/direction at a time, which should help.

The key to traversing the roadway during the project is patience. On Tuesday, the first day of lane closures, drivers heading south into town seemed to lack this virtue.

As they approached Veterans Memorial Drive driving in from Henderson, drivers seemed to ignore the clear warnings that the outside lane was being closed. They waited until the road before them was blocked by orange cones and then forced their way into the other lane. It’s a scene played over and over in construction zones and one that often leads to crashes and road rage.

Then, they impatiently moved forward, until they could turn right onto Veterans Memorial Drive — some weaving through the cones to enter the turn lane — and zoomed down the road as quickly as they could. But once past the light, traffic flowed nicely and at a good pace, despite the lane closure that ran to Gingerwood Street. Perhaps it’s because those impatient drivers left the main entrance into town that there were no problems.

City officials have said the work should not impact businesses along Boulder City Parkway too much and they are doing what they can to provide access as the project continues.

If you need to drive in the area, you can check the status of the project on a Facebook page set up to provide updates: www.facebook.com/MeadowValleyBoulderCity-Parkway.

We can only hope the timeline for this project, which is being supervised by Meadow Valley Contractors (and not the city itself), will not drag on like the $1.4 million revitalization of Nevada Way that started in late 2011 and wasn’t completed until early 2014 when the the arch welcoming visitors to the historic downtown area was installed. Granted, part of that delay was caused by the construction of CVS.

The end result, though, completed the vision established by the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada, which is funding the bulk of this project, as it was finalized during construction. And that is to make streets more accessible to people, bicycles and buses, as well as adding plants that help improve air quality and features that make them safer.

It’s a fair trade off — a couple of months of inconvenience for a future filled with beauty and the satisfaction of knowing our health and safety is a top concern of our government officials.

All it takes is a bit of patience.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Good changes on horizon

Changes are on the horizon for Boulder City residents. While change and the unknown future can sometimes be scary, in this case, it is not.

Being a dad brings great joy

Father’s Day was founded in Spokane, Washington, at the YMCA in 1910 by Sonora Smart Dodd. Its first celebration was in the Spokane YMCA on June 19, 1910. The Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart was a single parent who raised his six children there. Because Dodd’s father was born in June, she encouraged churches in her area to honor fathers that month.

Legislative session marred by partisan politics

When I began the 81st legislative session in the Nevada Assembly as a second-term legislator just a few short months ago, I was given a leadership position as minority whip. It has been my absolute honor to serve in this position.

Big questions not being asked

When a conspiracy theory becomes a fact, what does the mainstream media call it?

Passing ballot questions paves way for new pool

How should we define community in Boulder City? I believe our community is certainly larger than the sum of the parts that make up the town. Parts of the community have a greater impact than others of course. One of the parts is the municipal pool that was built soon after Boulder City became a municipality in 1960. The original pool was replaced around 1980 with the existing pool. After 40 years, it is not surprising the current pool facility is in very poor condition.

Pool adds value to community

The citizens of Boulder City are being given the opportunity to cast votes for what they value in a community. The upcoming ballot issue in regard to a new city pool runs much deeper than lap lanes and a dive tank. We are being asked to vote on community values.

Class of 2021 ready to succeed

A hearty congratulations are in order for members of Boulder City High School’s class of 2021.

Capitalists must value employees

As a former small business owner, I am a big proponent of capitalism. Capitalism is the primary engine that our economy is founded upon. Small businesses, entrepreneurship, free enterprise are some of the elements that make up the foundation that keeps our country’s economic engine purring.

Federal job guarantee gives workers choice

Ever hear the phrase: “I’m a lover not a fighter”? Or maybe you heard it the other way around. No matter. I like to think of myself as a lover but ready to fight for what I love and believe. What about you?