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One man’s Tour de Boulder allows reflection

This past month was the 100th Tour de France. Late at night, I watched man and machine spin through the beauty of the French countryside. Rolling hills seem to dot the landscape and ebb to steep snow-covered mountains. As the camera panned over castles and small picturesque towns, I grew jealous that France was saturated in history.

The combination of human drama and beautiful landscape made for an excellent show.

So I decided to do a Tour de Boulder. I would ride five rides in five days in Boulder City and surrounding areas. The first ride would be to Nelson and back. The second ride was from the bottom of Boulder City to the top as it went from the shoreline of Lake Mead to the top of Bootleg Canyon. Third day is referred to as the lake loop or river mountain trail. The fourth day I would mountain bike the trails of Bootleg Canyon.

The last ride I called the Boulder Loop, which became my favorite ride of all.

As I ride I notice that all the places I pass have meaning to me and my mind begins to wander. The first thing I pass is the Boulder Creek Golf Club. I think that I would love to walk on the grass in my bare feet.

Next is the airport and I see the skydivers as they plummet toward Earth screaming with joy that their parachute just opened. I pass Veterans Memorial Cemetery. I’m humbled by all of the Boulder City residents who have been to war and silently thank them for their service.

I head uphill and pass Garrett Junior High. How many children have passed through those hallways, including mine?

I turn right past the town cemetery. I wonder where I will be buried .

The road makes a bend to the left, and the desert on the right is where I got my truck stuck many years ago. I pass a church on the right then approach an intersection with five streets. One building looks weird.

I pass the city recreation center. How many people have played in that gym? The government park is next where Art in the Park and Spring Jamboree are held, and where the Damboree parade route starts. I head down Nevada Way. It is congested. People from around the world are there mingling with us Boulderites.

The main part of town is small as it only takes 30 seconds to ride past the shops and restaurants. I want to open a Waffle House.

I make a right turn and head through a street with some old homes, they have more character than new ones. I cross the highway and wish there was a bridge because traffic is crazy. I go to Industrial Road and think of the businesses and wonder how the economy is doing.

I think things are picking up. I hope.

I head back to my house and feel that Bolder City is rich in history. I love the people who live here. We live here for a reason. It is quiet and small. We have our history. Our people.

This was a wonderful first Tour de Boulder. Next year I may do 10 days in a row. Anyone what to join me?

Andy Huxford is a local businessman who grew up in Salem, Ore., and graduated in 1985. He moved to Boulder City in 1991.

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