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Make your vote count

If all the political signs around town weren’t enough of a reminder, here’s another. We are in the midst of an election for a mayor and two seats on the City Council.

Early voting for the April 2 primary began Saturday and continues until March 29.

Residents can cast their ballots at any voting center in the county. Closer to home, they can vote at City Hall from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Though it’s been said you have no right to complain if you don’t vote, that’s not true. Our First Amendment provides us the right of free speech, which includes complaining — if you so choose. Yet, that may not be the best course of action.

Being part of the election process is important. Casting a ballot for a candidate who has a specific platform helps direct the course of action once the election is over.

Every vote truly matters.

There have been several instances in history in which candidates have won by just one vote and twice in the past 17 years there have been ties in Nevada. Instead of costly recounts, both of those races were settled by drawing playing cards, with the high card winning the race.

The mayor and council races, in particular, are others where one vote can make a difference. If any candidate receives half of the number of votes cast — plus one — he or she is automatically elected and the field advancing to the June 11 municipal election is eliminated or reduced.

Making the decision to vote is easy. Selecting which candidate to support can be a much more difficult choice. This election is no exception.

Listening to the mayoral and council candidates during the forums we hosted to help voters make that decision, one tenet came through loud and clear: Each person believes he or she is the best person for the job. All seem to have the city’s best interests at heart. It’s how they intend to get there is where the differences come through.

It’s not our place to tell you who to vote for. There are minor philosophical differences between the candidates, and each has his or her own way of approaching an issue. You need to decide whose actions and ideals mesh with your own thoughts.

Each, with the exception of candidate Brent Foutz, who seems to have bowed out of the race, could do the job and would probably do it to the best of his or her ability.

Please keep in mind that this is not and should not be a popularity contest. Being popular does not equate to being qualified. Knowledge and a thorough understanding of the issues facing the city is key. Studying a problem from multiple angles can often bring to light the easiest approach to finding a solution.

It’s easy to be on the outside looking in, casting aspersions on someone’s ideas or actions, without knowing the full story or the limitations placed upon them by statute or resolution.

Regardless of the election’s outcome, those who have taken the giant leap into the political arena must be commended for trying to be part of the solution. We all can do our part, too. Just head to the polls and make your vote count.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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