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Letters to the Editor, July 4

Historic preservation more than slogan

Congratulations to our new City Council and mayor. Everyone agrees that historic preservation is important; now let’s get to work. The tools, strategies and priorities of the strategic plan 2020 to 2025 preserve our unique community by placing historic preservation as one of the city’s top goals. The action plan is a road map for an open public debate to further that goal.

The city’s pending designation as a certified local government makes the city eligible for grants and resources for a variety of historic preservation projects. We are moving forward on hiring historic development planner, who’s expertise can move that forward. Historic preservation is more than a slogan.

The city issued a request for information for possible uses for the old airport, hopefully to create the Bullock Field Historic District. If established, it would be the first new historic district since the establishment of the Downtown Historic District in 1989.

Bullock Field could be a historically themed, vibrant mixed-use development that can complement and support the future railroad museum and the complete street project along Boulder City Parkway, while building a new economic engine for our town.

I became involved in historic preservation when the property next to my home was torn down. I felt empty when we lost the old hospital. It was the collective failure of the community that brought those buildings down because we couldn’t agree what we wanted and didn’t have a plan to save it.

Now is the moment that we must find common ground and develop a plan for saving our historic assets. Boulder City is not where the Depression happened, it was where the Depression ended. Our little town are the Winged Figures of the Republic that help inspire a nation. I think that story is worth telling and preserving for future generations.

Alan Goya

City’s electric grid should be decentralized

A lightning strike tripped circuit breakers at an electrical substation. New York City suffered a blackout on the night of July 13, 1977. There was no electricity for the next 24 hours. Since store alarms didn’t work, there was citywide looting. Arsonists burned down many sections of Brooklyn. It took the city more than a decade to recover.

I would like to believe that we Boulder City people would be more civilized during a prolonged blackout and would focus on helping each other survive instead of burning down our buildings.

While power engineers have been admirably successful at building reliable power grids, available generators should be developed and deployed to provide each of our buildings and homes their own sources of electricity. My “Gallery of Clean Energy Inventions” exhibit (see padrak.com/vesperman) displays profiles of 60 generators. Of these, 44 seem suitable for reliably generating electricity for individual buildings without paying for fuel.

(The gallery exhibit profiles 19 larger generators, 34 smaller generators, 25 advanced self-powered electric vehicle innovations, 29 radioactivity neutralization methods, 27 space travel innovations, 20 technical solutions to water shortages, and a torsion field school network. The exhibit also includes 40 movie posters and 78 colorful Hubble Space Telescope images.)

The new Boulder City Council should resolve to wean Boulder City off the grid as a worthy long-term goal. It may be helpful if I exhibit in the City Hall profiles of only these 44 generators.

Gary Vesperman

Call from police department another scam

A friend of mine received a scam call June 25. The caller ID showed the Boulder City Police Department number, 702-293-9224. The called informed my friend that he was officer Victor Wallace of the Boulder City Police Department and he had a warrant for her arrest. What money did she owe? He said she should check her credit reports. She owed money and could avoid the arrest by calling U.S. Financial Resources, 844-335-1094, and paying the required amount plus interest and the attorney fees.

Since she was going to have her attorney call, he said he would see her at the court house.

Gene Breeden

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