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School zone improved

Children in Boulder City will be able to walk to school a little more safely as the city is installing better crossing lights and new signage along Adams Boulevard.

The project includes installing better crossing signals and instituting a slower speed limit whenever children are present on Adams Boulevard from Avenue G to past King Elementary School. Currently, the slower speed applies just during school hours.

“This project is part of our school zone improvement plan to ensure safety of children, parents and crossing guards as well as motorists,” said Gary Poindexter, superintendent for Boulder City Public Works Department. “The old flashing-light system is being replaced with a system that meets county standards.”

Poindexter said the new crossing lights will be placed horizontally over Adams Boulevard and will be able to be seen from farther away.

“The sign language is also being amended,” he said. “The current school hours … will be replaced to signify the lower speed limit is enforced when children are present.”

Additionally, the new signs will save time and effort for city staff because they can be programmed and do not have to be set up manually on a regular basis.

The city’s cost for these new lights and signs is almost $30,000.

According to Dave Stanton, building maintenance supervisor for public works, funds for the project are from the public works street operations budget.

“The city has spent approximately $27,000; that includes two overhead AC-powered lights and two pole mount solar lights, all with full communication capabilities,” he said. “The poles and mast arms were donated from another local jurisdiction from their surplus, which helped us save on costs.”

Stanton said the city is doing this project to keep people safe.

“We’ve been addressing complications over the past two years with the current system and consider it obsolete by today’s standards,” he said. “The manufacturer helps us when possible, but they are no longer servicing or improving our components.”

Poindexter said the installation should take about two weeks, followed by testing and residual work.

“We planned to get it done by Aug. 12, the first day of school, so as of now we are ahead of schedule,” he said.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

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