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News Briefs, Oct. 17

Help needed to complete census

Workforce Connections is helping the Census Bureau hire workers to help with the 2020 census count.

Hiring events will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23, and from 3-7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28 inside the Boulder City Library, 701 Adams Blvd. Part-time and full-time positions are available, paying between $16.50 and $18 an hour, depending on the job. Applications can be submitted online at 2020census.gov/jobs.

Those seeking a job with the Census Bureau must be at least 18 years old and have valid identification to complete an I-9 form. Males must have registered with the Selective Service System or have a qualifying exemption. Those interested must also be able to work a flexible schedule that could include days, evenings or weekends.

Background checks will be conducted.

BCR seeks Halloween displays

Do you love Halloween? Do you, a friend or neighbor create an outlandish display for the holiday?

The Boulder City Review is compiling a list of the Best Dam Halloween Haunts to be featured in the Oct. 31 issue. It could be fun or frightening, and if it’s in the spirit of the holiday, we want to know about it.

Please send details about the display, where is it located, your name and a telephone number to news@bouldercityreview.com by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18.

Trial delayed for former City Council candidate

The trial in the appeal of former City Council candidate Brent Foutz has been set for after January in District Court. It is for charges in Boulder City Municipal Court stemming from a confrontation last year.

On July 18, Judge Pro-Tem Margaret Whitaker found Foutz guilty of trespassing, not amounting to burglary, and resisting a public officer for a December confrontation in which he refused to leave the Southern Nevada State Veterans Home, 100 Veterans Memorial Drive, after being told he had trespassed and must leave. Whitaker fined him $500 for each charge and sentenced him to seven days in jail with credit for time served.

Foutz appealed the decision in District Court and requested a jury trial. Judge Richard Scotti denied the request for a jury, which Foutz appealed to the Nevada Supreme Court. That court dismissed his appeal Tuesday, Oct. 15, for a jury trial.

According to the minutes from Foutz’s Oct. 10 status check hearing, the court ordered the trial for his appeal for “after January.” The order did not specify what type of trial it would be.

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