52°F
weather icon Clear

Man who killed rabbits back in jail

A former Boulder City resident who was sentenced to house arrest for mutilating cottontail rabbits could remain in jail after allegedly making threats against a prosecutor.

According to court records obtained by the Boulder City Review, Devon Yslas was in court Aug. 7 for a status check, which had been scheduled five days after he was taken into custody because of accusations that he made the threats.

Clark County District Attorney Christopher Laurent said there is ongoing investigation about those alleged threats.

Previously, Yslas’ case was prosecuted by Amy Ferreira, chief deputy district attorney, but it had been reassigned to Laurent before the Aug. 7 hearing.

According to court documents, Yslas’ defense counsel, Erick Ferran, argued that he should be able to return to house arrest, allowing him to retain the job he’d recently secured and continue his court obligations, as no new charges had been filed and the allegations were unfounded.

Judge Victor Miller ordered he remain in custody at the Clark County Detention Center until an evidentiary hearing at noon Tuesday, Aug. 21.

In February, Yslas pleaded no contest to two counts of cruelty to animals, one count of wanton waste of game (amended from hunting out of season), one count of unlawful manner of hunting with aid of artificial light, and hunting without a license or permit. He was arrested Sept. 7 on suspicion of unlawful camping and making a false statement to/obstructing a public officer.

During that arrest, officers spotted evidence that connected him to the mutilation and death of several rabbits the day before in Bootleg Canyon Park.

Miller sentenced Yslas on July 10 to six months in jail to be served through house arrest for one charge of animal cruelty. In addition, Yslas was required to do weekly psychotherapy sessions, have no contact with animals for six months, do 50 hours of community service and stay out of trouble for six months.

That sentence runs consecutively to his other ones in this case.

Miller withheld sentencing for one count of animal cruelty pending results from Yslas’ psychological exam and tests before issuing a sentence on the final charge.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Fitration plant’s zoning unchanged — for now

After hearing nearly two hours of comments from community members about the importance of preserving the city’s historic artifacts, planning commissioners failed to pass a resolution that would recommend changing the zoning of a 1.92-acre parcel that houses the old water filtration plant from neighborhood commercial to government park during their meeting Wednesday, Jan. 15.

Home in mine goes bust

The abandoned mine shaft that was home to Richard Roman for the past seven years is now empty.

Business Beat: Jack finds fairy tale ending to dream

A Boulder City resident is fulfilling her longtime dream of opening a local child care center to care for infants through school-age children.

 
Eagle eyes keep bird count accurate

When it comes to counting bald eagles, technology has to take a back seat to good old-fashioned fieldwork. At Lake Mead National Recreation Area, that means biologists, binoculars and boats.

Historic properties to be surveyed

Boulder City will be able to take stock of its notable resources at no cost to residents after receiving a grant to cover the cost of updating its list of historic properties.

News Briefs, Jan. 23

New fire chief starts Monday

Regular screenings can detect cervical cancer

January is cervical health awareness month, offering an opportunity to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from HPV (human papillomavirus) and cervical cancer. HPV is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity, and it causes almost all cases of cervical cancer.

Child custody issues require civility

Again this week, I will attempt to address some common issues regarding child custody. These civil issues are handled through family court and are enforced by their revision to the order or sanctions.

Police Blotter, Jan. 23

Jan. 14, 4:44 a.m.