78°F
weather icon Clear

Lake Mead readies plan for lower water levels

The National Park Service has completed all the steps needed to amend its general plan to address lower water conditions at Lake Mead.

Recently, the organization completed the required environmental assessment that included a finding of no significant impact. That finding means Lake Mead National Recreation Area can address operational needs to maintain lake access and to provide safe and diverse recreational opportunities at water elevations above 950 feet.

“Now that the plan has been finalized, it will be our guiding document for adjusting operations if water levels recede below 1,050 feet,” said Christie Vanover, public affairs officer at Lake Mead National Recreation Area. “There are no additional steps related to developing the planning document. It’s complete.”

According to the park service the plan would allow existing marina operations to be reconfigured and launch ramps to be extended farther into the lake. The current marina capacity would also be maintained with associated roads, parking and utilities spread across those locations.

Marina operations and launch ramps at Hemenway Harbor, Callville Bay and Temple Bar will be extended to an elevation of 950 feet.

At elevations below 1,000 feet, marina facilities and the launch ramp at Hemenway Harbor would be relocated to deeper water closer to Hemenway Wall, as would associated roads and utilities.

At Callville Bay at elevations below 1,065 feet, the launch ramp and marina facilities would be extended farther into the lake or relocated to Swallow Bay. At Temple Bar for elevations below 1,050 feet, the launch ramp would be moved farther into the northeast part of the lake.

For Echo Bay, the park would research whether to reestablish full-service marina operations there. If the launch ramp and marina were reestablished, both would extend to an elevation of 1,000 feet. At elevations below 1,050 feet, they would be relocated to Pumphouse Bay.

Launching at South Cove would continue to be permitted at the end of a park-approved road.

The signed finding of no significant impact can be found at https://parkplanning.nps.gov/documentsList.cfm?projectID=52509.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Risk of water shortages projected

An increased risk of potential water shortages in the Colorado River Basin is expected for the next five years, according to projections released earlier this week by the Bureau of Reclamation.

Grant program to aid small businesses

Boulder City has a new grant program to help its small businesses and residents weather through the COVID-19 storm.

Survey reveals fewer ‘historic’ properties

Boulder City will not lose its spot on the National Register of Historic Places even though it no longer has enough contributing properties in the historic area.

Program reimburses families for missed school meals

Students in Boulder City may receive money to pay for meals they missed out at the end of the 2019-2020 school year.

Economic options to be explored

The volatile nature of tourism, which plays a significant role in Boulder City’s economy, has led some of the town’s leadership to explore the idea of attracting other industry opportunities to the community.

Risk fund to pay legal expenses

The city will not have to allocate money from the general fund to pay for its legal representation in a Nevada District Court case involving two of its staff members, according to the head of the finance department.

Mounted police unit great asset for city

This series of day-in-the-life of stories provides a candid look behind the scenes of the Boulder City police officers who protect and serve Boulder City.

Motion to halt firings of city attorney, city manager denied

The motion for a preliminary injunction to prevent City Council from terminating the employment contracts for the city attorney and city manager was denied the morning of Sept. 3 by Jim Crockett, a judge in Nevada’s Eighth District Court.

Complaint reveals plot to end employees’ contracts

A plan to terminate the employment contracts of the city attorney and city manager and deny them their severance pay may have begun more than a year ago, according to a new motion filed in a District Court case against the city.

Goya resigns from Historic Preservation Committee

Longtime Historic Preservation Committee member Alan Goya has resigned from his position, citing the lack of City Council support as a reason for the decision.