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Dispatchers ask questions for a reason

This week’s topic is a brief overview of what to expect if you call 911 for an emergency.

When you are in a stressful situation minutes can seem like hours and the dispatchers of Boulder City are aware of this; however, we must ask all the questions and obtain the most complete information for safety issues. We are required to ask the caller to repeat certain information to ensure that the information is complete. This can be extremely frustrating when media sources lead people to believe that we can pinpoint your exact location and phone information at the time of your call.

We must ask you to repeat your phone number and the address of the emergency. The more uncooperative or upset the caller may be, the longer it takes to get emergency responders to the location. Please remember that it is our intention and sole purpose to get you the help you need in the shortest possible time. Help us to help you.

We work in a dynamic environment where there may be multiple calls coming in and being prioritized for service. We will have radio noise in the background, phones ringing, lobby visits and another 101 things handled by our department. With very few exceptions the dispatch center is the hub of all department operations and the officer, paramedic, animal control officer or detective you see is a result of a request or response from our division.

In addition, Boulder City provides its own utilities so there is no Nevada power or water district to field the calls for service; the majority come through our office. This includes holidays, after hours and nonwork days.

Boulder City Police and Fire departments have partnered with the National Academy of Emergency Dispatch for all medical-related calls. This includes, but is not limited to, falls, seizures, sick persons, unknown problems, stroke, heart problems, drowning, animal bites, allergies, breathing problems and even CPR — step by step. Each answer you give determines the direction the computer-aided program will take the questioning to ensure the most accurate information for the first responders.

This is for those responding and those on the scene. Please be patient with us and understand that you have no idea what other emergencies and/or urgent issues are being handled at the same time. Our priority is your safety and we appreciate your patience and understanding.

Jan. 24. Disturbance: The caller reports a man yelling loudly in the nearby area at 4:03 a.m. in the 700 block of Capri Drive.

Vehicle burglary: The vehicle was relieved of nearly $700 worth of items at 5:11 a.m. in the 1400 block of Bronco Road.

Thought for the day: Lock your vehicles and take all valuables inside at night or whenever leaving for an extended time.

Jan. 25. See person: The subject in the lobby is not happy he cannot take custody of an impounded vehicle that does not belong to him at 5 p.m. in the 1000 block of Arizona Street.

Civil: The subject in the lobby has questions on how to prevent a sibling from removing a relative from a care facility at 10:53 p.m. in the 900 block of Adams Boulevard.

Thought for the day: Impounded vehicles can only be released to the registered owner, per policy.

Jan. 26. DUI: The unconscious man in the driver’s seat isn’t cooperative and is served a search warrant to collect evidence and the evening is complete with a trip to the crossbar hotel at 3:38 p.m. in the 100 block of Ville Drive.

Assault: The intoxicated subject believes he was shot in the ear or pistol-whipped but the witnesses have a different story at 8:30 p.m. in the 800 block of Buchanan Boulevard.

Thought for the day: Sometimes the hard way and the only way are very similar.

Jan. 27. Attempted burglary: An observant neighbor prevents the burglary of a neighbor’s house at 3:49 p.m. at the 1300 block of Arabian Drive.

Keep the peace: The child exchange is being held in the lobby because of ongoing issues and one party is a no-show at 5:40 p.m. in the 1000 block of Arizona Street.

Thought for the day: It’s another example of how a neighborhood watch prevents crime.

Jan. 28. Burglary: The workers return to find the locked up area was broken into during the weekend at 2:23 a.m. in the area of Veterans Memorial and Veterans drives.

Abandoned vehicle: The caller states yet another boat and trailer has been parked with no current registration and not near a possible owner’s residence at 11:07 a.m. in the area of U.S. Highway 93 and Yucca Street.

Thought for the day: Unregistered vehicles may not be parked on a public street and registered ones must be contiguous to the home address.

Jan. 29. Suspicious: Officers arrive to reports of several suspicious events but find the caller may be suffering from the effects of medication when the reported deceased animal is found to actually be a lamp at 12:58 a.m. in the 1300 block of Darlene Way.

Traffic: The driver gets an expensive reminder that when a street is blocked and marked as closed that means no traffic at 2:31 p.m. in the area of Wyoming Street and Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: Officers are actually relieved to find the canine quite undead.

Jan. 30. Trespass: The caller states that a strange person is beating on the door and making threats from a previous employer at 11:47 a.m. in the 800 block of Avenue A.

Theft: The caller states an acquaintance was in need of some basic items to care for themselves and in the process of providing it. The caller found some items of value were taken at 3:40 p.m. in the 100 block of Walker Way.

Thought for the day: Do not leave people you do not know well unattended in your home.

Quote of the week: When told he would have to return home an elderly gentleman, possibly suffering some age-related issues, advised the responding officer that he would not go. He loudly announced that he would “gladly” commit a crime before returning home, and jail sounded like a delight. He was, eventually, convinced to give it a try at home for just a little longer.

Tina Ransom is a dispatcher with Boulder City Police Department. She is coordinator of the Boulder City Citizen’s Academy.

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