57°F
weather icon Clear

City manager outlines goals for 2019

City Manager Al Noyola wants to create a historic preservation plan this year and continue to build confidence in Boulder City’s leadership and staff.

His objectives for the coming year were part of his annual report, which was presented to the City Council recently.

“I think it is important for the city manager to communicate to the council what was accomplished in the last year and what is coming ahead in the next year,” he said.

A major item Noyola wants to accomplish in 2019 is to create a structure for how the city preserves its historic assets.

First, he said, the city must have a plan for preserving its historic properties because that will dictate what the standards will be. Once the plan is created, the city will work to identify the properties and how to maintain, improve and restore them.

Noyola, with staff, also plans to start implementing Boulder City’s new strategic plan.

“Everything will not be done in year one. … I am trying to layout the plan over five years,” he said.

The City Council unanimously approved updating Envision 2020, its strategic plan, and extending it through 2025 at its meeting Dec. 11. Management Partners had been hired to help with the project, obtaining input from community members and city employees through an online survey with two public meetings and two staff workshops.

Noyola said he will explain how staff will implement the strategic plan to the council in February.

Out of all his goals for 2019, the one he said he is most excited about is boosting the community’s confidence in the city’s leadership and staff by ensuring decisions and recommendations city leaders and staff make continue to be fully researched.

“I do believe that we’re starting to see a change how the community perceives their city government, and I see the staff positively engaged and positive in moving forward,” he said. “If the staff and community are on board, that’s a recipe for success.”

Noyola said he also wants to update the city’s municipal codes, which were written about 30 years ago, to make sure they do not contradict the Nevada Revised Statutes.

“We can’t have things going against state and county law. … Also, we can see where there are opportunities to improve,” he said.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at cgoodyear@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Birthday Worth Celebrating

Noel Tipon, left, of Kailua, Hawaii, accepts a cupcake from Thomas Valencia, a ranger at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, as the park celebrated its 55th birthday Tuesday, Oct. 8. Joining in the cake cutting ceremonies was park ranger Matt Caire.

Racetrack lease amended

Human-driven cars can now be used at the racing facility on Quail Drive after City Council unanimously approved a lease amendment for it during its meeting Tuesday, Oct. 8.

Council hears ideas for use of old airport

City Council heard two ideas about how to use the historic airport property during its meeting Tuesday, Oct. 8, and could move forward by requesting formal proposals in December or January.

Man agrees to plead guilty to misdemeanor in groping case

A Boulder City resident accused of groping a disabled person during a car ride has agreed to plead guilty to a gross misdemeanor charge.

Abuse of 911 is misdemeanor

Let’s explore the area of misuse and abuse of the 911 system. A lot of times people are calling us on the worst possible day of their lives; we want to let them know there are people here to get them the help needed. That’s what we’re here for.

News Briefs, Oct. 10

Williamson joins city staff as airport manager

Kayak picture really clicked

A routine trip down the river led to a new experience for Terry Maurer: winning the 2019 Love Your Lakes photo contest.

City fine-tunes historic preservation goals

Boulder City’s leadership now has a more concrete idea of the Historic Preservation Committee’s priorities for the town.

City takes steps to ensure economic vitality

Long-term economic development in Boulder City now has a road map for the next four years, courtesy of action steps recently approved by City Council.