Pavement markings indicate where to drive


I’ve had a few requests for information regarding lane markings and their meanings. There are a few things that I am sure of about this issue: 1. That every driver’s test requires knowledge of these markings, 2. That the majority of people driving on the road today know and obey those markings and, 3. The ones that do will and those that don’t won’t — ever.

Pavement marking, or striping, is used to delineate where vehicles are to drive. Yellow is used to indicate opposing traffic and is to the left; white is used to indicate traffic in the same direction or markings that are normally driven over, like crosswalks and lane arrows.

You may pass or change lanes, if done safely, over single broken lines. For a solid line with a broken line, if you are on the side of the solid line you may not cross or pass other vehicles except to enter a driveway. If you are on the side of the broken line, passing is permitted, if done safely.

Crossing a single solid lane line is permitted but discouraged. You may not pass or change lanes except to turn left to enter or leave the roadway as from a driveway over double solid lines.

Center two-way turn lanes are marked with a solid line to the outside and a broken line to the inside. A left turn may not be made from any other lane when a turn lane is provided and passing is not allowed in a center turn lane.

You may travel up to 200 feet to turn left from the roadway. You are allowed to travel only 50 feet when merging back onto the roadway using the turn lane.

Yellow or white diagonal stripes are used to mark areas where motorists are not allowed to drive or park. Raised pavement markers are used to mark lane lines, center lines and storage lane lines on county-maintained roadways.

Construction zones may create no-passing or no-lane-change zones that are clearly marked with signage. Disregarding traffic laws in a construction zone can net you double fines.

June 29. Disturbance: The caller said someone knocked on her daughter’s bedroom window, and now they are outside involved in an argument at 12:48 a.m. in the 500 block of Arizona Street.

Suspicious: The renter has moved but seems to have left counterfeiting equipment behind at 3:48 p.m. in the 600 block of Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: “I thought you put it in the car …”

June 30. Assist other jurisdiction: The traffic stop ends up with two on the way to jail on warrants and the vehicle in car jail at 1:43 a.m. in the 600 block of Yucca Street.

Traffic stop: The driver is in a big hurry and seems to have forgotten the restriction of an alcohol-interlock device at 10:40 a.m. in the area of U.S. Highway 93 at mile marker 6.

Thought for the day: Officers try to be fair and lenient, however, blatant disregard for the law is a direct lane to their bad side.

July 1. Domestic: Officers are summoned to break up a loud and physical altercation between two parties at 12:19 a.m. in the 1300 block of Arizona Street.

Noise: Several calls come in from residents who are not happy with the early-morning wake-up call of heavy equipment for several weekends in a row at 7:09 a.m. in the 300 block of Lakeview Drive.

Thought for the day: The best way to celebrate landing a good job is not getting arrested on a battery charge.

July 2. Domestic:One party is locked out but reports the sounds of crashing and breaking items at 12:13 a.m. in the 500 block of Fir Street.

DUI with accident: Several parties witness a crash and the vehicle flee the scene at 2:09 a.m. in the 800 block of Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: It’s a busy night for officers and jail personnel.

July 3. Suspicious: The caller states the subject has one shoe, a suitcase and is face down on the driveway at 7:02 a.m. in the 1100 block of Fifth Street.

Animal: The noisy occupant of the chimney is found to be a very large bird at 10:37 a.m. in the 1400 block of Bronco Road.

Thought for the day: There’s nothing like alcohol to convince you that asphalt is a great place to take a nap.

July 4. Assist: The caller advises the battery has died and now the doors and windows of the vehicle won’t open at 10:46 a.m. in the 600 block of Arizona Street.

Suspicious: The caller reports that a scruffy man carrying a violin case was demanding medical records and has now left riding a bicycle.

Thought for the day: I think I’d get rid of any car that had the ability to lock me inside, especially in this heat.

July 5. Suspicious: The caller reports the neighbor went to the doctor a few days ago and has been acting strange ever since at 11:55 a.m. in the 800 block of Sixth Street.

Disturbance: A report comes in about several people outside having an altercation at 11:28 p.m. in the 800 block of Nevada Way.

Thought for the day: Turns out the fight is frustration after the expenses of the vacation turn out to be a little more than expected.

Call of the week: Animal: Officers respond to an entry alarm and arrive in time to see movement in the area of the ladies room. Further investigation results in the eviction of one female (we hope) snake from the facilities and relocation to the wild at 7:43 p.m. July 3 in the 500 block of Avenue G.

Tina Ransom is a dispatcher with Boulder City Police Department. She is coordinator of the Boulder City Citizen’s Academy.