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Set stage for more drama in our lives

Life is not always easy. Each day we face an assortment of new challenges.

Some are easy to handle and others are nxot.

For the most part, I would say the majority of us would rather not have more drama in our lives.

But the right kind of drama would definitely be welcome. Perhaps a comedy or musical would be nice, too.

For nearly as long as I can remember, theater has played a big part of my life. From skits around the campfire to touring Broadway musicals, with school and community productions in between, I have loved the performing arts regardless of whether I was on stage or in the audience.

Then there are concerts. Indoors or outdoors, pop or classical, music fills my soul.

Visual arts have been equally important. Drawing, painting and photography classes filled my schedule when I was in school and have remained a part of my life since then. Visits to art galleries and museums are regular occurrences.

During the past few weeks, my calendar has been filled with arts-related events. And after attending both performances of Boulder City Chautauqua earlier this month, I can’t help but feel like something major is missing from the community.

I know I am not alone in feeling this way. I have talked with several people who are patrons of the arts. While they support what is here, they think more can still be done and shared.

“We have so many talented people in town … musicians, artists, dancers, writers, etc. We would love to have Boulder City be a cultural mecca,” one woman emailed me.

She praised the town’s art and film festivals but believes there are still gaps that need to be filled, perhaps something on a permanent basis such as studios devoted to filmmaking, art or theater.

Businesses also could offer classes in costumes or makeup or the supplies needed to support the various arts, she suggested.

Catering to the arts is only one idea of several that are being bandied about recently to help the community thrive in the wake of traffic being diverted around town.

There are also ardent supporters of other proposals to keep the community vibrant and an attractive destination, including allowing the use of all-terrain vehicles on city streets and creating a trail system for them, adding new special events such as this November’s Pooch Parade, continued promotion of the city as an adventure tourism locale, and many marketing campaigns.

I don’t have the perfect solution. But if, as William Shakespeare wrote in “As You Like it,” all the world’s a stage, maybe the folks in Boulder City just need to dust theirs off a bit and make sure it gets used more often.

Hali Bernstein Saylor is editor of the Boulder City Review. She can be reached at hsaylor@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9523. Follow @HalisComment on Twitter.

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