86°F
weather icon Partly Cloudy

Letter to the Editor, Feb. 7

Civility needed for election

“A house divided against itself cannot stand …” We have all heard this famous excerpt from Abraham Lincoln’s 1858 speech. And while we all know what it meant from a historical standpoint, it still presents a relevant lesson for all of us today.

How do Lincoln’s words relate to us here in Boulder City? Think back to the last election cycle. When I do, I shudder when I think about how mean and nasty many of our finest citizens behaved during that critical time in our city. Neighbor vs. neighbor. False accusations. A near moblike atmosphere in many of our City Council meetings. Name-calling. Bullying. Yes, I said the “B” word. If our children had behaved the way so many of our citizens behaved in that cycle, we would have sent them to their rooms for a timeout.

In contrast, I found the opinion editorial (Blend of old, new good for city) in this newspaper’s edition dated Jan. 31 to be quite refreshing and delightful. The article rightfully highlighted the positive viewpoints of our two little new communities of The Cottages and Storybook Homes — but what impacted me the most was the last paragraph: “There is no reason why the city can’t mix in some new things with the old. … The key is finding the right balance. It would appear that’s exactly what is happening here.”

So with the election cycle once again underway, can we promise each other that we can put “civil” back into “civics” and actually all act like we are proud to be citizens of this wonderful community called Boulder City? Let’s bring “civility” back to our civic discourse. We can disagree but not be disagreeable. We can have intelligent measured discussion. We can compromise. We owe it to each other.

Kevin O’Keefe

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
United as a society we can make a difference

What are we waiting for? Folks complain that politicians are unethical, dishonest, disconnected from the people and individual voters don’t matter. So, whose fault is that if this statement is true?

Political views influence how we act, react

With every new year, young people are expected to integrate rather abruptly into adulthood. Something that’s part of “adulting,” or at least should be, is voting. Our little city just finished elections for this year. Unfortunately, it’s unlikely that these young people did vote.

Congratulations to new city leaders

Congratulations to Kiernan McManus, who was elected mayor, and James Howard Adams and Claudia Bridges, who were elected to City Council in Tuesday’s election.

Celebrate flag, all it flies for

June is here and brings with it the beginning of summer and other celebratory events.

Sinister roots lie in city’s shadows

Musician Neil Young and I share two connections. First, we have both been through Boulder City. Young was here in the ’70s and again rumored to have visited Lake Mead after playing Las Vegas with Promise of the Real in 2015.

EDITORIAL: Campaign tactics tarnish election

In just five days, local residents will head to the polls and cast their votes to determine what the face of the city will look like for the next few years and what direction they want officials to take regarding the possibility of building a new pool and allowing off-highway vehicles on city streets.

DAVE NELSON: Norwegian independence celebration here to stay

Syttende Mai is Norwegian for “seventeenth May.” It is the date, like our Fourth of July, when Norwegians won independence from the Dano-Norwegian Realm in 1814. Like the American experience, this occasion was little commemorated during the early decades, but youthful citizens’ urge to party caused bigger and bigger celebrations to crop up in towns big and small across Norway.