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Buchanan project will alleviate flooding

Boulder City is about to break ground on one of its largest flood control projects in recent years to help alleviate excess water along Buchanan Boulevard.

The project, which will cost $4 million, is expected to begin within the first two weeks of September, according to Public Works Director Scott Hansen. Funding for the project comes from the Regional Flood Control District.

The project will be the second largest of its kind since the district began working with Boulder City, according to district spokesperson Kelsey Hand. The largest was the $4.6 million Hemenway Channel in 1990.

Planning for the Buchanan project began in 2010, but was put on hold because construction was about to begin for the Nevada Way project, Hand said. That project included major utility upgrades, landscaping and paving, and the entry arch over Nevada Way.

Preparation for the Buchanan project resumed last year.

“What we don’t know yet, is when exactly it’s going to start,” Hansen said.

The city is scheduled to meet with Meadow Valley Contractors soon to discuss construction, including how Buchanan will be broken down during each phase, Hansen said. The Phoenix-based company specializes in heavy highway and civil construction projects.

The project will mainly consist of an underground pipe that will transfer water on Buchanan from Elm Street to El Camino Way. Upgrades to the concrete channel along Buchanan will be included.

“When we get a good rainstorm, it bubbles right back over the road on Buchanan,” Hansen said. “One of the biggest benefits will be keeping the water below ground in the storm drain where the water will dump into the channel near the hospital.”

Northbound Buchanan will have one lane closed during the span of the nine-month project, but Hansen said the construction shouldn’t be too much of a hindrance for locals.

“Our residents are really smart. They know how to get around the construction,” he said. “And for the most part, Buchanan has more capacity than it really needs on a daily basis.”

Hansen said residents on El Camino will be affected the most by the construction at first, but said that the upgrades would take place only during daytime hours.

“I’m sure when construction starts we’re going to have some complaints, but that’s just part of the nature of the business,” he said.

The four-phase project is expected to be completed by June.

Contact reporter Steven Slivka at sslivka@bouldercityreview.com or at 702-586-9401. Follow @StevenSlivka on Twitter.

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